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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in animal teachers
Indian Flying Fox: Fearless Exploring

One of the largest of Bats, Indian Flying Fox (Pteropus giganteus) has a wingspan of more than a child's height. During her flight, She extends her legs outward to expand the span of her wings. A strong swimmer, Indian Flying Fox crosses rivers using her wings as flippers.

Less feared than other types of Bats, Indian Flying Fox eats only fruit. Her favorite is very soft bananas which She swallows whole.  However, with mangoes, She extracts the juice and spits out the seeds. Indian Flying Fox is an important pollinator in the tropics, and a major dispenser of seeds. In certain parts of India, She is regarded as sacred.

Unfortunately for Her, her desire for fruit has led Indian Flying Fox in conflict with people. Because She causes extensive damage to fruit orchards, many farmers consider Indian Flying Fox to be a pest. Governments in South Asia have instituted kill programs to stop Her, since they consider Indian Flying Fox to be “vermin.”

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Big Brown Bat: Unintended Consequences

Originally a forest dweller, Big Brown Bat (Eptesicus fuscus) now roosts in attics. Moreover, He makes his home in the eaves of people’s houses. Seen around city traffic lights, Big Brown Bat hunts for Insects along the tree-lined streets. He has maternity roosts in bridges, and eats the bugs attracted there by the headlights of cars.

Found in the Americas, Big Brown Bat tolerates the cold by hibernating during the winter. He can be found sleeping in tunnels and abandoned mine shafts. Unlike other Bats, Big Brown Bat lives for as long as 18 years. Biologists believe that his hibernation is the major reason for his long life. Also, his relatively large size allows Him to remain active in cooler weather.

Beneficial to people, Big Brown Bat eats as many as 1,200 Insects in one hour. Flying in a stately, unwavering manner, He is an agile hunter, trapping Moths by throwing his wings around Them like a net. Although, He is still abundant, his numbers are decreasing yearly.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Animals of The Way

Animals who stay to help you after delivering their message are known as “Animals of the Way.” They will travel with you for a part of your life’s journey. Although these animals are not life-long companions, they may stay with you for years. Once they are no longer needed, “Animals of the Way” will leave. As with “Message Animals,” you need to accept them. Of course, find out about who they are and how they live. Enter into conversations with them, and ask how they can help you.

Sometimes you can ask a particular animal for help for temporary aid. But first, figure out whether the animal can work with you. Some animals are better equipped to help with particular problems. For example, Ferret is preferable to Sloth in increasing your physical energy. Moreover, animals that you have a relations with will be more disposed to helping you. Before asking a “strange” animal for assistance, do something to honor them first.

For example, I was grieving over the loss of a family member, and had asked the Manatees to comfort me. Since I assisted in various conservation efforts for manatees, They were more than happy to help. These friendly vegetarians know loss, for They have grieved over their fellow Manatees killed by motor boats. Soft and peaceful, the Manatees were all encompassing in giving their love to me. Through them, I was healed.

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Fruit Bats (Flying Foxes): Know What is Important

Flying Foxes (Pteropdidae) have large eyes, oval ears, and excellent memories. These large Bats differ greatly from their smaller insect-eating Cousins. Instead of using echolocation, Flying Foxes use their excellent sight and hearing to find fruit. They roost outside in the sun instead of in caves.

Once a suitable roosting area is found, Flying Foxes mass in the tens of thousands. These semi-permanent spots or camps may hold as many as one million Bats. At night, they leave their camps to search for flowers and tasty fruit.

What people notice the most about Flying Foxes is their screeching. Their mixture of screeches and cackles is their bat language. Flying Foxes “squabble” to establish roosting sites, ward off rivals, talk to their Pups, and warn others. (They, also, watch the body language of each other as well.)

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Bat Family: Facing The Shadows

This month I will be featuring various members of the Bat Family.

The Bat Family (The Order Chiroptera) accounts for one fifth of the mammal species on earth. The only Mammals on earth to fly, Bat Family is divided into two groups – Megachiroptera, the large Fruit Bats of the Old World, and Microchiroptera, the smaller Bats that people know worldwide.

 Known as “Flying Foxes”, Megachiroptera have foxlike faces with large eyes. Flying with steady wing beats, Flying Foxes rely on their sense of smell and sight to navigate. With wide spans the size of a small adult, These Bats, also, use their wings as flippers for swimming. Flying Foxes feed on fruit, pollen, and nectar. 
Vital to the forests they live in, They promote the growth of new plants.

Microchiroptera hunt at night, using echolocation to locate Insects. In addition, these Bats eat fruit and pollen. They roost in caves, under bridges, any place where the temperature of the air remains stable.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
CAPE GROUND SQUIRREL: Doing What Works

Living in the semiarid places of southern Africa, Cape Ground Squirrel (Xerus inauris) shades Herself with her tail from the hot sun. Active during the day, She likes to eat in the morning. Afternoons are for socializing and grooming. During other times of the day, Cape Ground Squirrel will sunbathe if the weather turns chilly.

Cape Ground Squirrel will share her burrow with Meerkats and Yellow Mongooses. In gratitude, Meerkats will call alarms to warn Her. The two mammal species will live in a mutual relationship.

Cape Ground Squirrel lives with other Female Squirrels in large underground burrows. She usually feeds on seeds, leaves, and roots. However, Cape Ground Squirrel is not above acting cute and begging from people. Her favorite haunts are the rest camps of the governmental parks in South Africa.

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Eurasian Red Squirrel: Living With Ordinariness and Wonder

Smaller and shier than Grey Squirrel, Eurasian Red Squirrel prefers living alone in the pine forests of Europe. After searching meticulously for food, He takes his pine cone to a secure branch for safety. Holding the cone in his front paws, Eurasian Red Squirrel rotates it while biting off the scales to get at the pine seeds.

People have admired Eurasian Red Squirrel for centuries. According to the Norse of Scandinavia, Ratatosk lived in the Tree of Life. He carried messages to Eagle, perched at the top, and to Snake, coiled around the roots. For his efforts, Ratatosk enjoyed the special protection of Thor, the God of Thunder.

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