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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in antler

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Antlers Forever

Gods know that I'm no great fan of Patricia Kenneally-Morrison's Kelts-in-Space series, The Keltiad, but that's not to say that, in her envisioning of what a pagan society might look like from the inside, she doesn't occasionally get things right.

Indeed, sometimes she gets them very right indeed.

PK-M's Kelts-in-Space know of a figure called the Caberfèidh, pronounced CAB-ber-fay. In Scots Gaelic, this means “stag's antlers.” In fact, he's no kind of fay at all—or maybe, on second thought, he is—but rather the pan-Keltic Antlered God Himself.

On Earth, Caberfèidh is the title of the hereditary chieftain of Clan Mackenzie. (“Clan” means “children”: hence, the “children of Mackenzie.” It's the Q-Celtic version of the word that's plant in P-Celtic Welsh, as in Plant Brân, the “children of Brân.”) A pretty felicitous image, this: the clan itself the stag, and the chief the very antlers thereof.

The metaphor is a profound one. That antlers are by nature deciduous, while the stag himself lives on, comments obliquely on the sacrificial nature of the chieftaincy.

Sure, and when it comes to the Caberfeidh, we're of one body with Him, indeed, and He Himself the Antlers.

And if you should hap to meet the Antlers Himself, be sure to say Him so.

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  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Mr. Posch, Who knows? Isolated off-world settlements might be ideal locations for pan-Pagan enclaves. Maybe not the future city

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Eyes of a Witch

How do you know a witch when you see one?

According to Catalan witch-lore, it's easy: you look into the eyes. Witches' eyes are distinctive.

(Catalunya's witches—bruixas—are a fascinating lot. Their witch-marks look like two horns, crossed. They dance naked a lot, especially on Midsummer's Eve, especially on Montserrat [Sawtooth Mountain] and Pedraforca [Forked Stone], the two sacred Sabbat Mounts of Català.)

Look into the witch's eyes.

In one eye, you'll see a double pupil.

In the other, a deer's antler.

Friend, can you read these runes?

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs

As we approach Winter Solstice there are many wonderful tales to tell. Tales that have been shared around fires for thousands of years.I have been working a lot creating prayer beads and this is a rather special limited edition set inspired by the Cailleach. They were made on the day of the full moon and now in the time of the waning moon as we approach the Winter Solstice the white moonstone holds that magic of the stillness and quiet this time of year can offer if we step away from the maddening crowds and take our inspiration from the landscape whose trees and plants have returned deep down to their roots.

 

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  • JudithAnn
    JudithAnn says #
    Thank you. The guided meditation and music was beautiful. I have been connecting with the Cailleach for the past few dark seasons

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
How Many Tines on That God?

I am a stag of seven tines.

(Song of Amairgin)

The Paris Cernunnos has four.

The "sorcerer" of Les Trois Frères, apparently, seven.

For all his youthful appearance, the Gundestrup Antlered sports a lordly fourteen.

Tines.

Antlers are a miracle. They're the fastest-growing bone on the planet. By Samhain, they're actually dead. Dead horns on a living buck: small wonder that the Antlered is reckoned lord of the dead.

Novelist Rosemary Sutcliff, in Mark of the Horse Lord, describes a cave-painting of the Lord of Herds and the Hunting Trail: "towering into the upper gloom, gaunt and grotesque but magnificent, the figure of a man with the head of a twelve-point stag."

Trophy-hunters value number of points: more is better. The more points, the older (and presumably wiser) the stag.

One wonders just what the meaning of different numbers of tines might be in representations of the Horned God. Having posed the question, the answers readily present themselves.

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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Elen - the Wild Spirit

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  • Jenn
    Jenn says #
    I love this so much!
  • Ted Czukor
    Ted Czukor says #
    Beautiful. Thank you so much.

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
How I became a Pagan #1 - Signs

 

It's been a year and a half since I began my journey into Paganism and almost a full year (Imbolc) since I chose a tradition (Reclaiming). I was the model Jesus Freak, the one my Christian community was sure about, the one who would never leave the fold. So how did I end up choosing a Pagan path?

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  • sarel
    sarel says #
    Thanks for sharing your story didn't know there is so many pagans that comes from a pentecostal background.
  • Kevin Thomas
    Kevin Thomas says #
    I too came from a strong Pentecostal/Evangelical background, which is very common among African-Americans. Now, ordained metaphysi
  • Jeanine Byers
    Jeanine Byers says #
    That's great, Kevin! And LOL about embracing "everything you were taught to hate." I know what you mean!
  • Cynthia Savage
    Cynthia Savage says #
    So, really, you are still Christian....
  • Lizann Bassham
    Lizann Bassham says #
    Thanks for sharing your story. I am both a Reclaiming witch and a Christian minister (in the United Church of Christ a Progressiv

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