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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Beltane

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Celebrating Halloween in Spring

Halloween is tricky business in Australia. For those who wish to indulge in the treat of dressing up, eating lollies (the more common term for 'candy') and celebrating all things spooky, there are a few barriers to hammer against. Luckily for those who have gazed at the event with envy overseas, those barriers are slowly crumbling and Halloween has made its presence felt down under.

Growing up, most Australians would not have experienced trick or treating in their childhood. It has never been a custom here - just a cultural curiosity on cartoons and movies. As time has gone on, trick or treating has hit the streets influenced by resigned parents and enthusiastic children wanting to take on the fun custom. This has sometimes been met with open hostility in some sectors; 'Americanization' is a dirty word here in Oz. Candy is bad, trick or treating is dangerous, kids up to no good on the streets, oh my! The bah-humbug is strong here. However, the sheer fun and frivolity has eaten away at our collective willpower much like a toffee apple at my cavities, and it seems Halloween is here to stay

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Beltane: The Cailleach’s Story (and Cailleach Film)

Some days when I look out my window from the Appalachians, I magically see the landscape of home, Scotland. The great mountain of Ben Lomond­ drawing in clouds of rain off the Atlantic. I can even hear the call of seagulls. No matter where I am in the world, I always feel that deep connection of a place called home.

That land, of which I am an integral part, is still connected to me, and still feeds me stories even though we are an ocean apart. One familiar character is the Cailleach, so old that even she doesn’t realize her own age. If you were to ask her how old age she was, she would reply:

'When the ocean was a forest, I was just a young girl'

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Lizann Bassham
    Lizann Bassham says #
    Thanks you - lovely to read and wise and wonderful words for my soul.
  • Jude Lally
    Jude Lally says #
    Many thanks Lizann x
Pagan News Beagle: Faithful Friday, May 8

Faith is a fact of life for many. But the plurality of voices and ideas is one for all of us. How then do you reconcile your deepest held convictions when they run contrary to those of others? Today's stories take a look at the many ways people of different beliefs come together... or not.

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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Time for melancholy

In theory Pagans honour the dark half of the year as well as the light, bright growing times. However, in practice we spend autumn talking about harvest, and while we do acknowledge the dead at Samhain, midwinter tends to be more about the return of the light than the deep darkness. There are many things the wheel of the year doesn’t give us much space to honour and explore. Loss, misery, nostalgia, regret, and despair don’t really find a place.

Of course it’s tempting to focus on the ‘good stuff’ in life – what seeds are you planting this spring, where’s your fertility for Beltain, what have you harvested, and lo, the sun is reborn and round we go again! However, if you don’t have a lover, and your health is poor or your plans aren’t working out, then these are tough things to celebrate and it can feel like there’s no room for your experiences amongst everyone else’s cheerful optimism. The wheel of the year encourages us to look forward in hope, not fear, and not to look back except when we can be pleased by the results.

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A Celebration of Life and Fertility!

Happy Beltane / May Day, fellow Witches and Pagans!

Beltane, which bridges the seasons of spring and summer, is arguably one of the most important and/or popular Celtic festivals out there and we’re doing all we can to help you celebrate. With that in mind, we’ve gathered the most relevant articles from across PaganSquare for your perusing. Additionally we’ve also gathered other pieces from across the web to inaugurate your summer celebrations as well as a few pieces about Earth Day, which passed earlier last week.

We hope you all enjoy your Beltane and have a wonderful summer!

-Aryós Héngwis

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Recent comment in this post - Show all comments
  • irene boyce
    irene boyce says #
    Hi Aryos, I have only recently discovered you beautiful people on this site...although I'm still struggling to figure out how it

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

The elements of sexy: a clean house, a clean you, light tasty finger food, and good drink. These four basics will engage your senses. Added extras would include some groovy tunes and fresh flowers, of course. You really cannot have too many good smells, sounds, and visuals today.

When cleaning, throw in about five drops of Bergamot essential oil in the mop water and/or for polish on wood. Bergamot is known for it's uplifting qualities, and also blends nicely with lavender. It is always a wise idea to take care of this the night before, so that you can wake to a clear and pleasant space – setting the tone for the day. Decorate your altar in vibrant reds, whites and florals as the last order of business before getting a good sleep. Don't forget to put some clean sheets on the bed (wink wink).

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

Tonight is May Eve, also known as Walpurgisnacht, the night before the Wiccan sabbat called Beltane. Beltane comes in midst of Spring, when nature;s generative powers are evident. In contemporary Paganism, Beltane has become, among other things, a celebration of pleasure, sexuality and sensuality. The joy of being physical, of having bodies and experiencing the wide range of emotions and desires, our capacity for play and creativity, and our ability to heal when we come together in community—all of these are the sacred gifts of Beltane.

In this time of celebration and joy, when love and passion are on our minds, can we look beyond the routine of every day and ask ourselves: Do we live with passion? When do we feel that? What deeply held value, what soul's longing, can we commit to today?

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