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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in christmas
Pagan News Beagle: Fiery Tuesday, December 15

People in Japan and Palestine find common ground rebuilding their communities. A Jewish survivor of the Holocaust decries racist attitudes towards modern refugees. And the Front National, a populist and xenophobic party in France, rises in electoral support. It's Fiery Tuesday, our weekly segment on political and societal news from around the world! All this and more for the Pagan News Beagle!

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Pagan News Beagle: Airy Monday, December 14

Christmas' most iconic monsters are listed. A comic featuring fairy tales from Asia prepares for its release. And Marvel's new Native American / American Indian superhero's debut is reviewed. It's Airy Monday, our weekly segment on magic and religion in pop culture. All this and more for the Pagan News Beagle!

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Pagan News Beagle: Airy Monday, December 7

Dark Horse Comics publishes a new story about mage hunters of BioWare's popular Dragon Age setting. Jason Mankey takes on some of the common myths about Christmas. And Disney pushes for a series of films about Merlin. It's Airy Monday, our weekly segment about magic and religion in pop culture! All this and more for the Pagan News Beagle!

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
December Madness

I don't even remember what finally set me off.

One too many Starvation Army bell-ringers?

One too many Muzak Silent Nights?

One too many smiling faces wishing me something that I don't want?

Whatever it was, by the time that I got to work, I was in a state.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
The Ramadan Rush

Oh great, just what we needed: another Christmas.

Snarled traffic. Interminable lines in the stores. Frayed tempers everywhere you turn.

Yes folks, it's Ramadan.

My neighborhood is diverse. Just to give you an idea: the woman on the corner is a labrys-wielding Goddess militant (her description). The Latino family next to her are Catholic. Next to them, Hindus upstairs and a secular Jew downstairs. Then there's us, Witch Central. Penny next door is some sort of Baptist. The Somali family next to her are Sunni.

And that's just the first six houses.

Like a surprisingly large amount of Muslim religious practice, the Ramadan fast is an old pagan custom; it used to be the moon during which the summer solstice fell. Muhammad is said to have chosen a fully lunar calendar over a lunar-solar one specifically so that the Muslim calendar would careen around through the year, thus avoiding the accumulation of those inevitable (and inevitably pagan) seasonal customs, like the Christian calendar did. Say what you will about Muhammad, you can't say he wasn't savvy.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Cowan Yule

The single best defense against Christmas is a good Yule.

I sometimes worry that I live too much in the pagan ghetto. Most of my friends are pagan; I live in a pagan home, immersed from day to day and from season to season in pagan culture. I know that there's a wide world of non-pagans out there. But after all these years, I also know who my people are, where my home is, and what my work is.

Midwinter's Eve our job is to bring the Sun up out of the Dark. We sing the Sun down, we light the fire; we dance, we sing, we keep the fire-watch through all the long night. 7:47 a. m. Midwinter's Day will find us out on the east pedestrian walkway of the Washington Avenue bridge, singing the Sun up out of the Mississippi Valley. December is on average the cloudiest month of our Minnesota year, when Earth and Sun hide themselves in their mysteries. But in those years when we actually see the Sun rise out of the river valley, with light and color flooding back into the world, well...that's Yule in little, and the joy of it continues for a full thirtnight of days, a year in miniature. Because we are who we are, we're part of something much larger than ourselves, something that would happen whether we were here to see it or not. It's something that we're privileged to take part in, and so long as we continue to do so, our people will continue to be. It's a joyous responsibility.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Thanks Cristina. Here in the US at least, Christmas is so massive that it can sometimes seem like a force of nature. I think it's
  • Cristina Potmesil
    Cristina Potmesil says #
    This comment, "Christmas is a human construct. If no one celebrated it, Christmas would cease to exist." is amazing. Thank you.

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs

Winter Solstice and Christmas stories are all about birthing: the light returns, the divine becomes human.

Embodiment.

Happy Holidays!

Before I continue about Magdalene, Mary, and birth-giving, ending with a prayer for us all, here are four versions of my season's greetings card for you (including one in French), images celebrating embodiment. Clicking on each thumbnail will take you to a larger display.

b2ap3_thumbnail_She-came-to-understand-2c-hh-venus-72.png 

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