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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in gender

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Identity

Identity, such an elusive concept/construct.  

Who are you?  

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  • Elizabeth Creely
    Elizabeth Creely says #
    You know, I own and have read "Infinite Cities" and have read Solnit and Gomez-Pena’s piece on contingent identities, but didn't r
  • Lizann Bassham
    Lizann Bassham says #
    I know, I love the whole book/atlas, but that one in particular was so sweet and wonderful to think about....
A Case for Radical, Progressive Paganism

 

When witchcraft first flourished in the 20th Century, it was cutting edge. Hot on the heels of the feminist movement, the fledgling environmental movement, and a time of great social upheaval, neo-paganism opened a whole new realm of possibility that at once called to our roots but also challenged dominant paradigms. At the same time, a lot of us are drawn to pagan beliefs when we ourselves undergo inter and intra-personal change. To dedicate yourself to a pagan path is a challenging step to take, and the journey is a difficult one. If it was easy - everyone would do it. To be a pagan is already a radical and progressive act. But is it enough? I'd like to offer my own interpretation of what radical, progressive paganism can look like.

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  • Ian Chandler
    Ian Chandler says #
    Thanks for the stimulating article and comments. Paganism is such a 'big tent' encompassing so many different beliefs and practice
  • Christopher Blackwell
    Christopher Blackwell says #
    Like most everything else in Paganism it is a matter of personal choice. If it ceases to be a choice than what good is it?
  • Peregrin
    Peregrin says #
    Hi Jon ... we are living in different 'Paganisms'. Lee clear says she rights "from the point of view of a progressive witch living
  • Jön Upsal's Gardener
    Jön Upsal's Gardener says #
    The irony of this post astounds me. The fact that you are really blind to its irony astounds me even more. Show me a neopaganism
  • Lee Pike
    Lee Pike says #
    As Peregrin mentions, the views I express here are totally relevant to the climate I'm familiar with. Maybe it is different where

b2ap3_thumbnail_AeternaSaltatus.jpg

Neo-Paganism as a Mystery Religion

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  • Piper
    Piper says #
    Rather than ascribe a gender, I typically use the Sephirot, Netzah and Hod as the focal ideas for this ritual, equal on the tree,

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  • Thesseli
    Thesseli says #
    This is one of the reasons I'm interested in Feri -- gender and gender roles are fluid, and you're not restricted by yours to any

Posted by on in Studies Blogs
Shuffling the Deck, Part Two of Duality.

It would now be pertinent to address how a conceptual duality and a gendered duality could function simultaneously without one enveloping or overpowering the other. Regardless of how high an individual holds an intellectual concept, the individual is still bound to gender. How then can a conceptual duality that stresses balance of all things remain exclusively masculine in it’s metaphors? The short answer would be that the conceptual duality goes “beyond” gender, that the metaphors can potentially be applied to gendered concepts, but ultimately refer to concepts understood as antecedent to gendered concepts. While this answer is ambitious, as a reply to a question posed by a society that holds gender to be reverent and relevant, it falls flat and lacks the humanizing element so often craved in religious discourse. To maintain a conceptual duality that preserves gendered integrity, much like gender, a few different options are available.

 

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs

In the first article for this blog I mentioned the Löwenmensch, a 32-35,000 year old mammoth tusk carving found in Germany. Archaeologists assembled this beautiful statuette of a lion-headed human from hundreds of fragments. And in recent years it has become the eye of a storm of debate about the gender politics of Stone Age shamanism.

Although heavily critiqued in the last forty years, the notion that Europe's first human denizens were socially and spiritually matriarchal is still popular. Some proponents of this view argue that the Löwenmensch is in fact a female, not a male. And inferring from this theory, a few of them have gone so far as to argue that shamanic practice in the distant European past was practiced exclusively by women.

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Paganism is one of the most democratic of spiritualities, right? It allows each of us to maintain and explore our own relationship with deity, practice pretty much as we like, and generally find like-minded people to work with along the way.
Except that it's not that simple (of course). We like to think that it's all sweetness, light and friendship, but as with any human philosophy, there are speed-bumps on the road that we're travelling.
 
Something that I've been really coming up against in recent months is the issue of hierarchy. If Pagans can each hold their own method of worship, then why do we even need leaders? Perhaps rather naively, I used to assume that each person understood that following a spiritual path involved investigation, constant challenging of the self and their chosen Way - otherwise it'd be far simpler to just find one of those other faiths with a set doctrine and follow that (less thought and effort required all round).
 
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