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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Gods

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

Bulls.  Big, strong, temperamental creatures that have had loomed large in man’s past.  Bull jumping, bull baiting, bull fights and running of the bulls are events where they were, and in some cases still are, featured.  They were used in the form of oxen to pull plows and carts.  Their virility kept up herds, generating wealth for their owners. In some areas, placing a bull head above a door gives protection and luck much like the horse shoe.  As sacrifices, few animals were more costly.  From them we get the terms ‘seeing red’ and ‘bull-headed’.  A lot of myths feature bulls, even modern myths like Paul Bunyan and his blue ox.  In some cultures, earthquakes are blamed on a rowdy celestial bull believed to have the world upon its horns.  A lot of masculine divinities, particularly those of the sun and the sky, are associated with bulls.

b2ap3_thumbnail_Minoan_Head_Bull_-_Heraklion_Archaeological_Museum.jpg

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  • Melia/Merit Brokaw
    Melia/Merit Brokaw says #
    I saw that but again I wonder if those are bulls or cows with horns. Sounds like an interesting temple!
  • Emily Mills
    Emily Mills says #
    Interesting post and great list thanks! I follow the research done at Catal Huyuk; their dig season just started back up, so I've
  • Stifyn Emrys
    Stifyn Emrys says #
    Great informational post. Odd coincidence: My wife and I were just talking about Paul Bunyan and Babe today.
  • Melia/Merit Brokaw
    Melia/Merit Brokaw says #
    Paul and Blue have been popping out at me a lot lately...I've been trying to figure out why. Thanks!
  • Samantha Lahlali
    Samantha Lahlali says #
    In Hellenic polytheism there is also Apollon who has perhaps a less recognized connection among oxen and cattle. Pausanias tells u

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

(Still on vacation this week!  Hopefully my travel mates are still on speaking terms with me!)

The god of the guessing game is Thor! 

b2ap3_thumbnail_Thor.jpg

Too easy?  It wouldn't have been for me as I know very little of the Norse pantheon.  I can, however, now tell my son the differences between Marvel’s Thor and Thor of the Norsemen.

 

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

I’m on vacation this week, so instead of an article I leave you with a guessing game. 

My 6 year old son recently asked me about this divinity and how he differed from his doppelganger.  Hopefully, this is not too easy.  Explanation will be posted next week.

 

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  • Amarfa
    Amarfa says #
    Frey?

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

When I was a child, I would wave to the man in the moon who I imagined peering down at me through the window. 

b2ap3_thumbnail_Man-in-the-Moon-from-L-Richter.jpg

It wasn't until I became a Pagan that the moon came to be associated with the feminine.  The phases of the moon just seem like the perfect symbol for the stages of a female and for the menses.  So when I first heard about moon gods, I was sure there was some mistake.  How could that be?  It not only can be, but isn't as unusual as I thought it was. 

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  • Peter Beckley
    Peter Beckley says #
    Wonderful!
  • Joseph Bloch
    Joseph Bloch says #
    My wife and I often have half-joking arguments about whether the moon is a "he" or a "she".
  • Fred J. Fritz
    Fred J. Fritz says #
    An interesting list to explore! Thanks for posting!
  • Rebecca Buchanan
    Rebecca Buchanan says #
    Thanks for the list. Considering how many Gods -- moon and otherwise -- are associated with bulls, perhaps you could write a colu
  • Melia/Merit Brokaw
    Melia/Merit Brokaw says #
    It is an interesting thought...but how many goddess are associated with cows for the same reason? Are the gods associated with bo

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

“Let’s hear it for the God
Let’s give the God a hand
Let’s hear it for the male
You know you gotta understand
Maybe he’s no Romeo
But he’s my loving deity
Whooa, whooa, whooa-oh
Let’s hear it for the God!”

You know what? I get it. Really I do. Goddesses are wonderful beings. Yes, they have been neglected and abused in the past and in some cases, still are. But. Let’s learn from that and not do the same thing to the Gods. One hears a lot about feminine deities…pictures, stories, poems, prayers, divination decks, etc. You can find Pagan/Polytheistic items with a goddess theme quite easily any more. Not so much for the masculine divinities. Often they are relegated to the sidelines, treated as a minor player, if mentioned at all. I get it. I did it too. But then Zeus came along…

...
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  • Melia/Merit Brokaw
    Melia/Merit Brokaw says #
    Thank you! Another book?! Quit tempting me!
  • Rebecca Buchanan
    Rebecca Buchanan says #
    Yay! Welcome to PaganSquare, and I look forward to your next blog. Oh, and if you are looking for a good resource/inspiration,
Coming to terms with my mortality

It has been over two months since I've written anything for Witches & Pagans. Looking back, it doesn't seem that long, but it's the truth. I've been on a journey, one that I hadn't planned on taking, and one that started as just an annoying, yet familiar pain. A problem I thought for sure I could handle, as long as I was strong, and just tried to push through.

Without boring you by explaining my medical history, I'm familiar with kidney stones. The first time, in 2011, I had them, I went to the emergency room, who readily pumped me full of drugs, told me to drink a lot of water, and wait to pass them. They passed. $4000+ to be told to drink more water.

In early March of this year, I got that familiar twinge in my back, and I was determined to not accumulate another $4000 of medical bills just to hear, "drink more water", so I drank a lot more water. The pain remained, steadily getting worse. I drank more water. I lost my appetite, and couldn't even keep food or water in my stomach. Then, on April 11th, I got really ill, not the kind of ill where you lay down in a dark room under blankets kind of ill. The kind of ill where your wife drags you to the car and races to the emergency room. I was in so much pain, and so sick that I passed out in the car.

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  • Fred J. Fritz
    Fred J. Fritz says #
    A powerful experience that will take time to process. Be sure to give yourself that time.
  • Peter Beckley
    Peter Beckley says #
    I'm working on it, Fred, thank you.

Posted by on in Paths Blogs

Administering justice is often placed in the sphere of influence of either Athena or Nemesis, and both Goddesses do, indeed, have connections to it. There is one Theia, however, who is the personification of the phenomenon of justice. Dikē (Δικη) is the Goddess of justice placed upon mortals, fair judgements and the rights established by custom and law. According to Hesiod, She was born from a joining of Zeus and Themis, the Titan Goddess of divine law, custom and prophecy. She has five sisters, Eunomia (Ευνομια, Goddess of good order and lawful conduct) and Eirênê (Ειρηνη, Goddess of peace and spring), with whom Dikē forms the Horai (Ὡραι), the Goddesses of the seasons and the natural portions of time; and the Moirai, the Goddesses of fate. Their names are Kloto (Κλωθώ, spinner), Atropos (Ἄτροπος, unturnable), and Lakhesis (Λάχεσις, Alotter).

 
The Horai: Eirênê, Eunomia, and Dikē
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  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Another great post! Such an important Goddess for us mortals...

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