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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Heathen
Why Charming of the Plough is Celebrated On More Than One Date

If you actually have a farm and use a real plough, it's traditional to bless the plough right before using it. The date that one would begin using one's plough would be different in different locations. 

Most pagan and heathen groups that celebrate Charming of the Plough on a specific date don't actually use a real plough for anything. Some American Asatru groups celebrate Charming of the Plough on the second day after Twelfth Night, which is January 3rd. Some celebrate it on February 2nd, which is otherwise called Candlemas / Groundhog Day / Imbolc / Imbolg / Brigid's Day. 

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Erin Lale
    Erin Lale says #
    Anthony, I love the Old Farmers' Almanac. I live in the Mojave Desert bioregion just south of Las Vegas, Nevada. We have different
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    Back when I was still gardening I would use the "Old Farmer's Almanac" to determine planting times for vegetables. I think the ear

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Embla

My practice of honoring the First Woman started with a weed. A weed is a plant growing where one doesn't want it. 

In June of 2016, I found a four foot tall plant in my tomato bed. Online friends on the Plant Identification group helped me positively identify it as a Siberian Elm, which is not the same species as the American Elm. Siberian Elm is an invasive non-native species, so it had to go. But, it was an elm. Elm is the tree the threefold Odin made the first woman from. Embla was her name, and was also the word for elm. I was unlikely to have an elm sapling again, so I had to make good use of it. I pulled it up roots and all and whittled it into an Embla doll with my pocket knife.

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Goddesses Brew

My Northern Lights Goddesses Brew debuted at Yule 2016, but it can be used for any occasion when one wishes to honor the heathen goddesses. It's an extract of herbs in grain alcohol. Because it uses fresh lavender, I can only make it when lavender is blooming in my garden. The grain in the grain alcohol honors Sif, goddess of wheat and corn. The herbs honor other goddesses, as listed below. I first extract and then strain the fresh lavender, which takes between one to three weeks, and then extract the other herbs from commercial tea, which takes about a week. 

Grain for Sif 

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Steel for Steel

There is a local Asatru kindred in my area which has a custom about steel weapons that has a parallel among the Theodish. Theodish magical theory holds that it is bad luck to give a gift of living steel. Living steel is a steel weapon that has energy and perhaps personality. Among the Theodish, living steel can only be bought, even if it's bought for a token amount. 

On Yule 2014, Tom and I attended sumbel with a local heathen kindred that is associated with a Renaissance Faire guild. Its leader has made some historical re-enactment weapons intended for combat sports. 

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Heathen Calendar and Slavic Calendar 2017

The calendar seeds I planted last February and March have come to fruition. The Heathen Calendar and Slavic Calendar Projects 2017 are now published through Spero Publishing, an imprint of Caliburn Press, and available on lulu. I am incredibly relieved, because producing the Heathen Calendar was a Yule boar oath, and now it is fulfilled. 

I ordered some Calendars and hope they arrive in time to vend them from the American Asatru Association booth I'll be staffing at my local Pagan Pride Day next Saturday. At PPD I'll also be giving a talk about Asatru, teaching a drum circle workshop, and participating in a panel of different traditions from the local community. 

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There's been a powerful disturbance in the Force the last couple days.

Yesterday, the group that calls itself the Asatru Folk Assembly left a Facebook post which I have screen-cap't at right. 

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  • Susan “Moonwriter” Pesznecker
    Susan “Moonwriter” Pesznecker says #
    Erin, Good work-- glad to hear this. Greybeard, I am simply reporting based on what I have seen and heard. I am nor "hurling hatr
  • Susan “Moonwriter” Pesznecker
    Susan “Moonwriter” Pesznecker says #
    Erin, Good work-- glad to hear this. Greybeard, I am simply reporting based on what I have seen and heard. I am nor "hurling hatr
  • Erin Lale
    Erin Lale says #
    The American Asatru Association is against racism, homophobia, misogyny, and other hatreds.
  • Susan “Moonwriter” Pesznecker
    Susan “Moonwriter” Pesznecker says #
    Greybeard, do I understand you to suggest that I (and others) are "hurling hatred" at the AFA? Nothing could be further from the t
  • Greybeard
    Greybeard says #
    Yes, there is a huge amount of intolerance and hatred being hurled at the Asatru Folk. Sad. Often those who shout the loudest a

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Wild Goose Chase for the Name Aurkonungr

I started my quest to find the name or word Aurkonungr while reviewing Lecouteux’s new Encyclopedia, which has an entry for Aurkonungr saying it is a name of Honir. Some of the entries had citations to sources, but not that one. Because I had never heard of such a name for Honir, I set out to find the source. Long did I trek through the mountains up the rocky river, seeking the source, the well of wisdom, beset by skaven and… ahem, no, I sensibly got on Google, which returned 0 results. That word literally does not exist on the internet. Well, it didn’t—it does now, ironically, here in this blog post.

Members of the American Asatru Association’s Facebook discussion group helped me track down where Lecouteux was most likely to have gotten the word from. Although aurkonungr does not appear on the net, there is exactly one return for a reasonable variation of the word, árkonungr: “et, que Ynglingasaga qualifie plusieurs rois de árkonungr, gódr árkonungr, roi, bon roi à moissons” from Tripertita: fonctionnels chez divers peuples indo­européens by Georges Dumézil.  This word is only written that way in French. In Icelandic texts, it's written as two words, ár konungr. 

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  • Carl Gustav Lindstrom
    Carl Gustav Lindstrom says #
    Ah ok - I wasn't sure if it was the latter, or a combination of the two.
  • Erin Lale
    Erin Lale says #
    You're welcome. This isn't a web host site, it's the website of a company that publishes magazines.
  • Carl Gustav Lindstrom
    Carl Gustav Lindstrom says #
    Hello, Ok - Yeah I was not selected, but at the same time I did not know how to get in touch with her. I did not quite understan
  • Erin Lale
    Erin Lale says #
    Hi Carl, if Anne has selected you to be one of the pagansquare bloggers, you should have received instructions on how to do it.
  • Carl Gustav Lindstrom
    Carl Gustav Lindstrom says #
    Hello Erin Lale, I hope you don't mind me asking for your help here. I just joined this site and it doesn't seem to be very user

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