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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Holidays

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Heathen Calendar 2018 is ready!

For real this time! The publisher has fixed the error and the Heathen Calendar 2018 is now ready to order.

The calendar contains heathen holidays from various traditions such as Asatru, Theod, Urglaawe, Forn Sed, etc., and heathen related holidays still celebrated in their countries of origin in northern Europe. For example, April 30th is May Eve in England, Walpurgisnacht in Germany and Austria, Valborgsmässoafton in Sweden, Valborgsnatten in Norway, Maitag Vorabend in Switzerland, and Valborgsaften in Jutland, Denmark. That is one of the holidays that falls on the same date every year, but other holidays shift depending on moon phase and other reasons. 

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Erin Lale
    Erin Lale says #
    Hi Kevin, thanks, it's this link: Link: http://www.lulu.com/shop/http://www.lulu.com/shop/erin-lale/2018-heathen-calendar/calend
  • Kevin
    Kevin says #
    Wheres the option to purchase i was trying to see price so i can alocate funds to save
Why Charming of the Plough is Celebrated On More Than One Date

If you actually have a farm and use a real plough, it's traditional to bless the plough right before using it. The date that one would begin using one's plough would be different in different locations. 

Most pagan and heathen groups that celebrate Charming of the Plough on a specific date don't actually use a real plough for anything. Some American Asatru groups celebrate Charming of the Plough on the second day after Twelfth Night, which is January 3rd. Some celebrate it on February 2nd, which is otherwise called Candlemas / Groundhog Day / Imbolc / Imbolg / Brigid's Day. 

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  • Erin Lale
    Erin Lale says #
    Anthony, I love the Old Farmers' Almanac. I live in the Mojave Desert bioregion just south of Las Vegas, Nevada. We have different
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    Back when I was still gardening I would use the "Old Farmer's Almanac" to determine planting times for vegetables. I think the ear

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs

b2ap3_thumbnail_December-2016-016.JPG

"The winter solstice happens in nature around us.  But it also happens inside of us, in our souls.  It can happen inside of us is summer or winter, spring or fall.   In the dark place of our soul, we carry secret wishes, pains, frustrations, loneliness, fears, regrets, worries.  Darkness is not something to be afraid of.  Sometimes we go to the dark place of our soul, where we can find safety and comfort.  In the dark place in our soul we can find rest and rejuvenation.  In the dark place of our soul we can find balance.  And when we have rested, and been comforted, and restored, we can return from the dark place in our soul to the world of light and new possibilities."

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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs

b2ap3_thumbnail_November-2016-010.JPG"Imagine that at every moment we each embraced the world as the gift it is: an apple is a gift; the color pink is a gift; the blue sky is a gift, the scent of honeysuckle is a gift."

--Rabbi Marcia Prager

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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs

In the new article Reclaiming the Radical Witch, Danielle Olson writes:

As her image grows ever whiter, more privileged, younger, prettier, and objectified in the west, women b2ap3_thumbnail_14884681_1809846729227541_4275433016924022846_o.jpgaccused of being witches in Africa, Latin America and New Guinea continue to be hunted down and burned alive. I can’t help wonder what this all means for the “real” witches here and now?

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  • Candise
    Candise says #
    powerful

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Holidays, Holy Days and Harvests

Right now it’s the summer holidays, and in many places, the young people are home from school, and families are off doing the holiday thing. Or trying not to kill each other. It’s worth noting however that the origin of the summer holidays has nothing to do with having a good time, and everything to do with needing the young people to help get the harvests in. The norms of our school systems pre-date the combine harvester and other such devices.

You don’t have to be much of an etymologist to spot that ‘holiday’ comes from ‘holy day’ and for many of our Christian ancestors, the holy days were the only days off, if you were lucky. Servants tended to have to work on Sundays and over Christmas etc, but religious celebration has provided our ancestors with much needed opportunities to down tools and socialise. The pilgrimage is the ancestor of the tourist industry, and holy journeys and holidays have a great deal to do with holidays.

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I offer what I offer fire
I give what I give
I share what I share
I am who I am…

via The Warrior-Priestess

When planning a ritual involving children, I always have to remind myself to keep it short and simple! Just in time for Spring Equinox, I’d like to share the simple ritual of spring welcome that is perfect for family or a small group of friends. This ritual is designed to be done at night around a campfire and to be followed by a drum circle, but can easily be adapted to day time (perhaps with a fresh flower mandala to gather around instead of a fire). It can take place anytime between March 21 and May 1 and still feel seasonally appropriate.

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