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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
God of Both Ways

They say that the god of the witches has two faces.

Bifrons, they call him: old Two-Face.

Ianiformis, they call him: shaped like Ianus, the old Roman god of Time.

Two faces, fore and aft. But of course what's before and what's behind is all a matter of where you're standing, isn't it?

For this, Margaret Murray named him Dianus = Ianus, lord of beginnings and endings, like the month that bears his name.

Two faces, and when you arrive at the sabbat, you greet him with a kiss on both sets of lips.

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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs

January, if we are lucky and our daily lives allow, can be a time of contemplation, of looking back over the past year, of quietly getting our lives in order, whilst also looking ahead to the summer to come. While the earth seems to sleep, with long nights and cold days, the first new shoots make it above ground and buds on the trees remind us that spring isn't far...but the time of quiet is still here for a while at least. I always find a struggle against natures rhythms is never very productive, and it's better to do what must be done in the modern world and retire to the fireside or get out under wide winter skies as much as possible. January to me is a liminal time, a threshold point and should be honoured as such- neither here nor there, neither the renewal and festivity of winter solstice nor the bright candlelight of Imbolc...it's that in between time when magic can really happen, when things can really change if we catch the moment and steer ourselves a little differently, or weave a new thread into our webs of wyrd.

I think the Celts of the past new this well, and liminal magic seems to be a forgotten skill of theirs. Janus figures, two faced gods named after the Roman god of beginnings and doorways crop up all over the Celtic world and are undoubtedly pre-Roman deities but are often unknown among those following the Celtic path today. Famous examples include  the double-faced horned Iron Age statue ( 4th - 2nd century BCE)  from Holzgerlingen in Germany, the two headed sculpture from Roquepertuse   ( 600-124 BCE) and the two double faced god statues, which are probably Iron age,  from Boa island in Ireland.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

b2ap3_thumbnail_janus-clipart.jpg

Next up in my tributes to the Gods placed in the atheist graveyard, I honor Janus, Divine Doorkeeper.  Yet I've already written about him once as Janus, God of Libraries, so below I leave you with an interesting excerpt of Ovid's Fasti (Book 1):  

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

I started a new job this week.  It is a job that I’ve always wanted.  I work in a library.  Responses from my friends have been highly amusing.  Anything from “that is the perfect job for you!” to “that’s like putting an alcoholic in charge of a bar”. 

I started wondering what god has libraries in his purview.  My first thought was Hermes but I connect him more with the internet and buyer/reader beware.  My second thought was Thoth or Seshat but neither of those felt right.  So I did some googling and stumbled across a blog suggesting Janus as a modern symbol for libraries.  Now that is an interesting thought.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    That's really original, and I like it. Congratulations on your new job! I'll make an offering to Janus the next time I visit a
  • Melia/Merit Brokaw
    Melia/Merit Brokaw says #
    Thank you times 2!
  • Terence P Ward
    Terence P Ward says #
    Book 'em, Danno. Sorry, couldn't resist . . .

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