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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Minoan

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
The Minoan Vegetable Garden

Some aspects of Minoan civilization feel very modern: big cities with paved roads, aqueducts, and enclosed sewer systems. But there were no supermarkets back in the Bronze Age, no international shipping of out-of-season produce.

I've written before about Minoan cooking methods and typical foods. I've even shared a grocery list of sorts, a compilation of all the foods we have evidence for - foods the Minoans cooked and ate.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    No doubt the Minoans also gathered a wide variety of wild greens, as the yiayias of Greece still do.
  • Laura Perry
    Laura Perry says #
    Yes, horta was apparently popular in Minoan times, as far as we can tell. I commented a bit about that in my post about the Minoan
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    Are you sure Eggplants are from the Americas? I thought they were from Southeast Asia.
  • Laura Perry
    Laura Perry says #
    You may be right. The Wikipedia entry for eggplant states "There is no consensus about the place of origin of eggplant" but the pl

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
How old is that blog post?

I began this blog in 2014. A lot of things have happened since then.

When I wrote the first blog post, Ariadne's Tribe didn't exist yet as a spiritual tradition. I and a handful of others were still groping around in the dark, doing our best to put the pieces together to figure out what the picture of ancient Minoan religion looked like. We hadn't even begun determining how to turn that into a modern spiritual practice.

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The Minoan Genius: Religion and Cultural Exchange

The Minoans were a seafaring, trading people who traveled all over the eastern Mediterranean and points beyond. During those travels, they encountered other cultures. They brought back objects from faraway places: cylinder seals from Mesopotamia, carved stone jars and jewelry from Egypt. They probably brought back spouses/partners from the places they traveled to.

They also brought deities back with them.

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs
This little piggy went to Knossos...

CW: animal sacrifice

Everyone knows the Minoans had cattle - the Minotaur is testament to that fact, as are the many bovine head rhytons and cattle figurines found at Minoan sites. Most people have heard that they had sheep and goats, and no one is surprised that they ate fish and shellfish, given that they lived on an island.

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Mysterious Minoan Tentacles

The Minoans were a seafaring people, so it's no surprise that their art is full of marine life, exhibiting their deep connection with the sea goddess Posidaeja. Most people are familiar with the dolphins and octopuses that appear on so many Minoan marine ware vessels and frescoes. But there's another sea creature that shows up in Minoan art, mostly on ceramic containers, a creature that was so odd, it took us a while to figure out its identity.

Have a look at the marine ware jug at the top of this post. The critter painted on it looks like an octopus that's holed up in a nautilus shell, sticking its tentacles out and waving them.

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Ancient Minoan Good Doggos

The Minoans had dogs. I remember being a little surprised to learn that, some years ago. Somehow, I just never connected "Minoans" with "dogs" in my mind. Cats, sure, but dogs?

Yep, they had them - in fact, the breed the Minoans had still exists on Crete. It's called the Cretan Hound and is considered to be the oldest European dog breed. That's one of them in the image above, on a carved stone pyxis lid from Mochlos dating to about 2400 BCE. I can imagine the person who owned that pyxis (a lidded jewelry box) choosing it because their dog loved to lie in the same pose, stretched out in the shade of an olive tree.

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs
What's missing from Minoan art?

What's missing from Minoan art?

Before you answer "The women's shirts," let me clarify that I mean here: What kind of animal is missing from Minoan art?

There are all kinds of animals in Minoan art, inhabiting the realms of land, sky, sea, and imagination. But there's one that doesn't show up until very late in the game, for very specific reasons.

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