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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in money
Financial support in the Pagan community

There has been some wonderful online discourse about the role of institutions in modern Paganism.  There are those who believe the price -- of leaving behind our counterculture roots -- would be too high.  Others believe that this is the only path to a mature religious movement, and still others propose solutions that include both.  I believe it's important to include the idea of financial institutions in this dialogue.

I'm not necessarily talking about banks and credit unions, although nothing is off the table.  While Pagans are frequently loving, giving people, our community lacks any institutional ways to support one another financially.  A credit union would certainly fit part of that bill, but not every problem can be solved with a loan.  Each of us face challenges and opportunities that could look very different with a bit more money:  wardrobe for a new job, affordable day care, credit counseling, even basic money management skills.  These challenges are quite effectively addressed by some religious communities.  Should they be in ours?

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  • Carl Neal
    Carl Neal says #
    Once again you have explained my feelings in a more eloquent way than I could have. I agree with this wholeheartedly. "Instituti
Pagan savings challenge, week one:  Q&A

My Pagan savings challenge post generated a lot of discussion on the Witches & Pagans Facebook page.  I thought it would be appropriate to share some of the questions and comments, in the form of a Q&A.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Pagan Savings Challenge

My posts in 2014 are finally going to start focusing on one of the most important money topics, debt.  However, before we talk about what we owe, I'd like readers to join me in expanding what we save.  I'm laying down the gauntlet:  can you raise as much energy as I?

Fans of the internet may be familiar with this post's graphic, which I believe originates here.  This is a simple, elegant way to save money, and one that should work well for Pagans.  If you're the sort that includes magic as part of, or in conjunction with, your worship, then as I said, it's simply raising energy so you can work your spell.  If your Pagan path has no truck with that sort of thing, pick an appropriate deity, force, or cause, and make this an offering.  I will continue to refer to it as raising energy, because you can just as easily use this energy for an offering as for magical work.

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  • Jan Nerone
    Jan Nerone says #
    I'm with you! 2014 is going to be a breakout year for me, personally, professionally and financially. Making an actual savings pla
  • Jason Hatter
    Jason Hatter says #
    I have started doing this, though I started with the most expensive savings first; this year I worked a bunch of holiday days at w
  • Terence P Ward
    Terence P Ward says #
    You are not the only one using a different savings model, and I welcome that diversity, Mr Hatter! I hope you will check in as th
  • Penny Lloyd
    Penny Lloyd says #
    I'm intrigued with the thought of deepening my spiritual understanding of money and finance and had already decided that 2014 woul

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Poseidon, god of the economy

I took an unscheduled blogbatical as we moved into the darkest time of the year, but I have emerged excited that I missed celebrating perhaps the most important historical festival for my patron deity.

Today is when the festival honoring Poseidon, called Poseidea or Poseidonia, was celebrated in antiquity.  It's a reconstructionist's nightmare, because virtually no record of what went on has been discovered, but the good folk of Elaion put together a Poseidonia ritual based on their understanding of what festivals were usually like.  I didn't see the announcement until just after the agreed-upon time to practice apart together, and I was already late for Quaker meeting, so I had Poseidon close to mind as I joined my local Friends in worship.  (I am not a Quaker, although I attend meeting for worship; I have pondered how Quakers and polytheists fit together for awhile now.)

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  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Mr. Ward, That Canadian $20 bill is wicked cool. Wonderful image, and so appropriate to the discussion.
  • Terence P Ward
    Terence P Ward says #
    I was thrilled to discover that image -- I feel it was created just for me!
  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Mr. Ward, Brilliant post. I'd honestly never thought of Poseidon's role with regard to the totality of human economies. It's so t
  • Terence P Ward
    Terence P Ward says #
    Those are some wonderful insights, Jamie. I'm sure the innocent people in Egypt are stunned to be meeting the new boss, same as t

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Running on empty

Time is money, so they say, and I seem to be more on the "money" side of the equation this month.  Money to buy gifts for loved ones and strangers, but the act of earning it has left me very short of time for the other important things, like wrapping gifts and writing blog posts.  So here's a few quick ideas about using time or money to prepare for Giftmas in all its forms, since few of us have both:

That's it for now, and two of my paid jobs and several people who want me to take on additional volunteer obligations are all awaiting my attention.

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  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Mr. Ward, Great ideas! Especially the quitting smoking part: Everybody dies, but who wants to die slowly and painfully? I wish I

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
'Tis the season to move money around

The beginning of shopping season may be blurry, particularly for those whose traditions include portmanteau neologisms, but it's safe to say that it's in full swing as I write this on December 2.  The convergence of the gifting culture and the end of the tax year in many locales also makes this the time when many charities make their year-end pitches.  Likewise, this is when tax-free gifts to family members are often delivered, stocks bought and sold to maximize profit or minimize taxable gains, and people who participate in pre-tax health savings accounts and the like are making sure that they've spent everything they're required to.

So there's a lot of money on the move right now, a lot of energy flowing.  I'd go so far as to say that December is to money what October is to the spirits of the dead:  if you want to work with money, this is one of the best times to do so.  Spells and prayers for abundance and prosperity, as well as workings and offerings which are released through the movement of money, are worth incorporating into one's practice at this time of year, when the secular cycles are so strong that they reveal the unseen powers which shape them.

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  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Mr. Ward, Thanks for sharing your thoughts, as well as the links! Some of the suggestions were just great.

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

Seeing the Maetreum of Cybele win its tax fight was satisfying:  justice prevailed, a small Pagan congregation gets treated with respect, the separation between church and state is preserved (if not strengthened) by a decision that basically said that local governments don't get to decide what religions look like.

The underlying principle -- that religious institutions don't get taxed -- is being upheld in a fair and consistent manner.  But in the belief that a good idea bears up under examination, all this hubbub inspired me to ask whether or not it's a good idea not to tax churches in the first place.

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  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Mr. Ward, Thanks for your article. I had no idea that in 1875, President U.S. Grant tried to abolish the tax-free status of churc

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