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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Review: The Undertaker's Daughter

 

The Undertaker's Daughter is the second album from singer/songwriter Mama Gina. It is a collection of stories, myths, and tales from her life that inspire and touch the listener. With this album, she is set to make a big impact in the Pagan music genre. Look out, world! Here comes Mama Gina.

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  • David Oliver Kling
    David Oliver Kling says #
    I enjoyed her song "The PSG Song," after having been to several Pagan Spirit Gatherings I can visualize the experiences he shared

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Review: The Fifth Element

The Fifth Element
by Kellee Maize

Female Pagan rap artist Kellee Maize released her fifth album, The Fifth Element, on February 14th, 2014. The album features 11 tracks of fun, funky hip hop and rap songs with a spiritual beat all their own. The overall theme of the album is Love. Every song deals with the subject of love in its own distinctive way.

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  • David Oliver Kling
    David Oliver Kling says #
    "I Know You" has a nice dubstep sound to it and probably my favorite track on the album. Thanks for sharing this since I would ne

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Not Giving It Up

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  • Ted Czukor
    Ted Czukor says #
    Right on, Joanna. You do not carry that chip alone! Many of the songs from my era had the same message, which I only began to r
  • Joanna van der Hoeven
    Joanna van der Hoeven says #
    Hi Ted! Thank you for your kind words! I wholly agree with you. x
  • aought
    aought says #
    It's so ubiquitous in our culture, you don't even hear it in the lyrics. I remember being quite old before it dawned on me that th
  • Joanna van der Hoeven
    Joanna van der Hoeven says #
    Too right. There's a song called Blurred Lines that has reached number one in the British pop charts. It's a song about a drunken

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs

     In the middle of lunch, my father looked into my eyes and asked who I was. This question stopped me in my tracks. For a moment, I forgot my father’s illness.   Instead, I remembered that he was responsible for naming me.

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Songs for the Feri Gods: Dian Y Glas

For this next edition in my series of devotional playlists for the gods of the Feri tradition of Witchcraft, we take a look at Dian Y Glas (and boy does he liked to be looked at). Dian Y Glas, also called simply "Blue God", Is the youngest [mostly]male emanation of the Star Goddess in the pantheon of Feri deities. Dian Y Glas is often seen as young, lustful, and androgynous. He represents the love and passion held deep within the heart of the Star Goddess, where all things emerge. 

Blue God to me represents the power of the ecstatic Craft that celebrates all things free and wild. His energy is chaotic but seems to make sense on a deep and cellular level. He is filled with pride, confidence, and attraction, which are all things that awaken within us when we follow the tune of his call. My playlist for Dian Y Glas consists of songs that make me jump up and down and scream "I am ME and I am completely and utterly awesome in every sense of the word."

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Songs for the Feri Gods: Star Goddess

I was a kid when making mix-tapes turned into making mix-CD's. I would make compilations for my friends that reminded me of them and give them out as gifts. In fact I still do this! CD's have turned into playlists that I have for all sorts of situations and ideas. I probably have more playlists on my mp3 player than I do songs. So in honor of my anniversary of starting to train in the Anderson Feri tradition of the Craft (mid-July) I'm making some play lists of my own.

Of all the concepts in Feri, the gods are probably what fascinate me the most. They are as abstract as they are embodied, as compassionate as they are fierce. For the next week I'm going to let you in on my playlists that I have for each of the Feri gods. Many of the Feri gods share similarities with other more popular Pagan deities so once you learn a bit about each one, you can see why I might have chose a certain song. They'll cover the whole spectrum of silly and sad and strange and sensible, just like the gods themselves. Oh, and they won't be "Pagan" either.

To start out, today's playlist features the Star Goddess. In the Feri tradition, Star Goddess is the original point of all creation. She is the nexus point from which all things emerge and return. All other gods extend outwards as manifestations of her limitless spectrum. The songs of Star Goddess focus on (obviously) the stars themselves, the expansion of space, and the lovely chaos of time outside of time.

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  • David Salisbury
    David Salisbury says #
    NOTE about the Owl City song: YES, I realize he wrote this with the intention of it being a Christian song and the lyrics "He is t

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

I dislike the term "world music"; it's basically an inaccurate catch-all term used for Mediterranean, Asian, African, and often enough Latin American folk music in a culture where "folk music" is based on the folk music traditions of the British Isles and regions of France and Germany and maybe a few other "Northern Europe" regions.  But already, I digress....


I also dislike most "pagan music".  I've gotten very selective about my cheesy gothic pop-rock with my old age (no offence to Inkubus Sukubus fans in the room), and when your paternal grandfather and both maternal grandparents got off the boat from said Isles, your step-mother, who was not Anglo-Celtic in any ancestral manner, becomes obsessed with Irishness after marrying your father, and half your teachers feel compelled to tell you about how they felt when they say Michael Flatley in Riverdance, or that Michael Collins film, the Celtic folk-based filks that often uncritically dominate the pagan community get really boring, really fast.  To make things  worse, when interacting with "pagans" on an interfaith level, rather than other Hellenists exclusively, my opinion is not a popular one:  My religion encourages competition and bettering oneself --it is completely fair to offer a constructive critique of another's "musical offering" among Hellenists.  Many ancient Hellenic festivals featured contests where, yes, there would be a winner and sometimes even a clear loser.  I once hosted a Mouseia poetry contest where a participant later harshly criticised me in their own blog cos they didn't win for a very good reason --they submitted a very generalised poem of Olympian reverence, and the contest guidelines were for a poem dedicating a community website to the Moisai.  In what basically amounts to an experience-based community with a large interfaith focus, where the status quo is that all good faith efforts to produce something "good" necessarily produce only "good" works, the idea that some works are necessarily better than others will not make one many friends.

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