PaganSquare


PaganSquare is a community blog space where Pagans can discuss topics relevant to the life and spiritual practice of all Pagans.

  • Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Tags
    Tags Displays a list of tags that have been used in the blog.
  • Bloggers
    Bloggers Search for your favorite blogger from this site.
  • Login
    Login Login form
Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Mythology

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

b2ap3_thumbnail_MMM.jpg

[Continuing our series of interviews centered around Myths, Moons, and Mayhem, we sit down for a Fast Five with author Greg Kosebjorn.]

 
BookMusings: Your story, “Squatchin’,” is set in the wilds of Oregon. Why a story centered around the hunt of Bigfoot? What drew you to that idea and location?
 
Greg Kosebjorn: I love the Pacific Northwest, and indeed most of my erotic fiction is set there. My intent for the story was to build a scenario around two men camping, and I wanted a reason for them to be there. Bigfoot is a large part of Oregon lore, and I thought it would be interesting to have at least one of the partners involved in the research. I also thought if the other partner wasn’t so much into it that it would create a good dynamic between the characters.

BookMusings: What sort of research went into this story? What is your favorite tidbit of Sasquatch lore?
 
Greg Kosebjorn: I’ve always been interested in Bigfoot, ever since I saw that famous 1967 Patterson-Gimlin film as a kid. It was both terrifying and fascinating to me. As I got older, I became more interested in the hunters themselves. Some of them are quite emphatic about their beliefs. 

BookMusings: Where can readers find out more about you and your work?
 
Greg Kosebjorn: I have a Tumblr blog and a Twitter presence (@gkosebjorn) but they are both very NSFW. Readers can also find me on Goodreads.

BookMusings: What other projects are you working on?
 
Greg Kosebjorn: I’ve been focusing on non-erotica projects for the past couple of years, and hope to have a novel out in the near future. I’m also looking at putting out a second book of erotic short stories.

BookMusings: Which book fairs, conventions, or other events will you be attending in the foreseeable future?
 
Greg Kosebjorn: Because I write erotica under a pseudonym, you probably won’t find me setting up shop at any events. However, you never know where I might show up as a fanboy. ;)
Last modified on

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

b2ap3_thumbnail_MMM.jpg

 

...
Last modified on
Pagan News Beagle: Airy Monday, October 2 2017

How do you get modern audiences to connect with mythology? How do you reinvent a classic but obscure comic book character? And can a video game adaptation of one of the internet's quirkier creative works capture its original appeal? These are just some of our stories for Airy Monday, our segment about magic and religion in popular culture. All this and more for the Pagan News Beagle!

Last modified on

Posted by on in Studies Blogs

Hello, and welcome to my new blog “Myth Maker: Modern Mythopoeia.”

In the next post, I’ll get to the meat of this blog, introducing you to a variety of lesser-known spirits from around the world and telling you the stories and teachings they tell to me. But I thought I’d start off by talking a little about mythopoesis as an art and a magical practice. The English word mythopoesis comes from the Greek μυθοποιία, and literally means “myth-making.” The second part of the word, “poeia,” is the root of our word “poet.”  Historically, the word was an obscure technical term, describing, as Victorian historians would tell it, that period of time when humans made myths “instead of science” to explain the world around them. However, in 1931, J. R. R. Tolkien (author of The Lord of the Rings) published a poem titled Mythopoeia, which was a direct response to his frenemy and Oxford colleague C.S. Lewis’s skepticism about the value of myth.  Lewis (at the time, although his views softened with the wisdom of age) believed that  myths are "lies and therefore worthless, even though 'breathed through silver.”'  Tolkien's poem replies...

Last modified on
Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Sarah Keene
    Sarah Keene says #
    One of the best explanations for the importance of myth that I have read comes from the Discworld novel Hogfather by Terry Pratche
  • Sara Mastros
    Sara Mastros says #
    Sarah: That's lovely! Thank you for sharing it.
Total Solar Eclipse: A regale of the Yayoi people, Amatsukami and Ama no Iwato

As the Total Solar Eclipse was a great event taking place across North America, I thought it would be the perfect time to write about the solar eclipse, and what it means in Shinto traditions - especially in regard to the famous Ama no Iwato myth. While it is unknown the true event associated with Ama no Iwato, it is said popularily it represents a solar eclipse – however when one studies further, a more significant connection would be to the Winter Solstice. However, indeed, solar eclipses would have most likely been significant as well, especially in relation to a recall of Ama no Iwato.

 

...
Last modified on
Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Olivia
    Olivia says #
    Hi Aryós! Thank you for your great comment! I actually plan to address that in an article I'm writing about the Yayoi and Jomon
  • Aryós Héngwis
    Aryós Héngwis says #
    Very interesting! I've been reading the Kojiki and have been wondering to what degree it reflects genuine historical record. Obvi

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Dragons of the Cosmos: Timeless Chaos

Dragons of the Cosmos are a part of the fabric of the Universe. According to many myths, these Dragons have either created the world or plotted to destroy it. They have an intense unbounded energy to accomplish their aims. Because of the danger They pose, these dragons are best to be avoided. Moreover, Cosmos Dragons only have relations with the Gods, and usually ignore humans.

The Great Mother Dragon, Tiamat of Babylon (pictured above) is one of the best known of the Cosmos Dragons. As the Creator, She formed the first Heaven and Earth with Her Body. Tiamat is also called the Lady of the Primeval Chaos, who avenges her spouse’s murder. According to Babylonian myth, She tried to rid the Earth of both Gods and humans, and nearly succeeded.

...
Last modified on

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Families of Dragons

To understand dragons better, people have commonly divided them into various families. As with scientific classification, organizing dragons into groups gives folks a framework to learn about them. By studying dragons in families, you can discern who are friendly and who are dangerous. Since each family has their own unique talents, they can also offer their matchless wisdom to seekers.

In Western Tradition, dragons are usually grouped into families by the elements. I have used that system to construct my classifications of dragons. Living in the East, the Dragons of the Air ride the winds. Meanwhile, the Dragons of Fire reside in fire, and are of the South. In the West, the Dragons of the Waters frolic in the waters. With the Air Dragons and Ice Dragons, Water Dragons rule the weather, as well. Ruling the Earth and guarding its treasures are the Dragons of the Earth, who reside in the North. Because each dragon family governs a cardinal direction, therefore in rituals a seeker can avoid the hostile ones and ensure her safety.

...
Last modified on

Additional information