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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Norse Gods

b2ap3_thumbnail_treesoul.jpg(excerpt from my Frey devotional book Peace and Good Seasons)

Frey has five primary ways of manifesting in the world. He is all five, at once, but some people see more of one or two than the others, and his dominant face changes at different points of the year. Here are my observations on the various sides of Frey.

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b2ap3_thumbnail_boar-torc.jpg(excerpt from my Frey devotional book Peace and Good Seasons)

Frey has five primary ways of manifesting in the world. He is all five, at once, but some people see more of one or two than the others, and his dominant face changes at different points of the year. Here are my observations on the various sides of Frey.

...
Last modified on

b2ap3_thumbnail_3791313279_4dc3567cab_z.jpg(excerpt from my Frey devotional book Peace and Good Seasons)

Frey has five primary ways of manifesting in the world. He is all five, at once, but some people see more of one or two than the others, and his dominant face changes at different points of the year. Here are my observations on the various sides of Frey.

...
Last modified on

b2ap3_thumbnail_Field.jpg(excerpt from my Frey devotional book Peace and Good Seasons)

Frey has five primary ways of manifesting in the world. He is all five, at once, but some people see more of one or two than the others, and his dominant face changes at different points of the year. Here are my observations on the various sides of Frey.

...
Last modified on
My Personal Pantheon (The Pagan Experience)

(For Week 3 for The Pagan Experience community blogging project, the theme is Deity and the Divine.)

For newer readers to my blog (and because I tend to forget to make occasional reintroductions like this one), hi, I’m Beth, and I’m a hard polytheist.  What this means for me is that the gods have firm, distinct edges to Them, just like mortal people do, and they are no less individuals than mortal people are. Very occasionally these distinct edges may overlap, but as a rule, in my own doxa and practice, syncretism is not a thing that happens.

I’ve also begun in the past year to self-identify as a Witch (the Traditional or Sabbatic type, not Wiccan) more so than Heathen (I realize that the two need not be mutually exclusive), but more about that in another post. Regardless of what category I fall into, I am a mortal wife of Odin (for more than twelve years now); I married Him back before “godspousery” was even a word, before there were very many pagan blogs at all, let alone “godspouse” ones, and He is the center of my practice and my life. (He does overlap nicely with the “Man in Black” figure of British Traditional Witchcraft–but again, more on that later.)

I live with a mortal wife of Poseidon (Jo), who is my life partner (though not in a romantic way) and sister; she and I support each other in living a monastic lifestyle in which our gods are the focus of our lives. We both have outside jobs, though mine is only part-time due to the fact that my chronic pain issues (fibromyalgia and arthritis, among other things) limit the amount of time I am able to spend sitting and working at a desk. I also run a currently part-time business offering my own handcrafted magickal items (ritual cords, candles, bath soaks, prayer beads, and soon soap, oils and incense), which I hope to grow into a full-time business. We are both writers, and are currently collaborating on a book about sacred marriage/godspousery.

But enough about me; back to my gods. As everyone who has worked with Norse deities no doubt knows, They tend to travel in packs, and if you have one around, there are usually others hiding in the woodwork, waiting to emerge. My own experience is no exception, and so here is a (fairly) brief rundown of the deities who make up my personal pantheon.

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Posted by on in Studies Blogs
Viking Grief

One of the most moving poems by the Viking poet/magician/farmer Egil Skallagrimsson was one he wrote lamenting the death of his favourite son Böðvarr who drowned at sea, and his son Gunnar who died of fever. In skaldic form the twenty-five verses give voice to his sorrow with passion and beauty. Normally Vikings assuaged loss with revenge but there is no one to attack for these deaths.

Egil composes the poem after vowing to kill himself by starvation, unwilling to live in a world without his son. His daughter Þorgerður tells him she will die with him, but tricks him into drinking some milk and spoiling his hunger strike. She then suggests that the best way to memorialise her brother is to compose a suitable poem in his honour so that he will live forever.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

When your doubts overwhelm
When you act out your fears
When failure drags you down
Call on Magni, son of Thor

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