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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Pagan art
Pagan News Beagle: Watery Wednesday, March 15 2017

A Pagan writer reflects on the way Beyonce's pregnancy announcement infers the imagery of Oshun. A group called "WITCH" gathers in Portland to fight for political and social causes. And a Korean shaman looks online for funding to help complete here training. It's Watery Wednesday, our segment about news regarding Pagan communities here and abroad. All this and more for the Pagan News Beagle!

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Recent comment in this post - Show all comments
  • Mivi
    Mivi says #
    Hey that's me (in the last paragraph)! Thank you for the signal boost.

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
A Call to Pagan Artists

 If you build the candy cottage, the children will come.

 

So: the well-heeled patron (or matron) of the pagan arts comes to you and says: “I want a temple, expense no object.”

What would you design?

What will the pagan temples of the future look like?

The New Paganisms are, for the most part, young religions, virtually all under 100 years old. For various reasons that I won't go into here, temple-building hasn't so far been a priority for us.

But that won't always be the case.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Sarah Avery
    Sarah Avery says #
    The complex needs an outdoor amphitheater, so we can reboot the Dionysia and any other performance-related sacred activities. It w
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Goddess bless 'em. And of course there's the new Asatruarfelgid hoff-in-building in Reyjavik: I've seen sketches but no blueprints
  • Anne Newkirk Niven
    Anne Newkirk Niven says #
    Not sure about "large scale" but may I be so bold as to point out the Cascadia druids blog about building their shrines, right on
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    May we both live to see it, Michelle, even so.
  • Michelle Gruben
    Michelle Gruben says #
    Interesting! I believe there is some Pagan temple planning astir, albeit in the realm of fantasy film/fiction. I'll bet you anythi
Pagan News Beagle: Watery Wednesday, January 25 2017

We've got the winners from a Norse mythology art contest. Elizabeth Creely talks about the mystique and appeal of Mary, the mother of Jesus. And a blogger discusses what it means to "put the gods first." It's Watery Wednesday, our news segment on the Pagan community around the world! All this and more for the Pagan News Beagle!

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Do Gods Have Halos?

It's something of a problem in contemporary pagan iconography.

Do gods have halos?

Halo: a disk of light surrounding the head, in art the conventional indicator of holiness. (In Greek, halo means “threshing floor”; threshing floors were clean, shining disks of ground.)

To Western eyes, halos may have something of a Christian look to them. For some, that's a problem.

But look East and you'll see that buddhas wear halos too, and so do Hindu gods.

In fact, there was a time when use of the halo was forbidden to Christian artists. Sorry, Crispus, halos are for pagans.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Midwinter Blood

It's one of the few known instances of actual King Sacrifice in the literature.

Dómaldi took the inheritance after his father Visbur, and ruled the land. In his day, a great famine and hunger engirded the Swedish thede (people). Then the Swedes offered great sacrifice at Uppsala. The first autumn they sacrificed oxen, but the following season was no better. The next autumn they held a man-sacrifice, but the next season was even worse. The third autumn a great many Swedes came to Uppsala when the sacrifices were to be offered. Then the chieftains took rede with one another, and agreed both that the famine was due to Dómaldi their king, and that they should sacrifice him that very year: take him out, kill him, and redden the altars with his blood.

And that is what they did.

So wrote Icelander Snorri Sturluson in his Ynglingasaga (1225).

Snorri's account implies a perpetrated violence, but in Swedish painter Carl Larsson's monumental 1915 canvas, Midvinterblot (“Midwinter Sacrifice”), the death of King Dómaldi becomes a moving act of willing self-sacrifice.

In this controversial painting, a festive crowd has gathered before the great stave-temple of Uppsala. Lurs blare, women dance, warriors march. Through the open doorway, we see the great golden statue of the Thunderer standing in a chariot drawn by golden goats. Before the temple the high góði stands with hammer raised to hallow the sacrifice. In the foreground, facing away from the viewer, stands the red-cloaked sacrificer, who holds the bright blade, ready but hidden, behind his back.

But the center of the painting is Dómaldi himself, his head thrown back, standing (like Þórr) on the sledge on which he has been drawn in procession to the temple.

Young, vigorous, bearded and redly beautiful, he is depicted in the act of shedding the red fox-skin cloak which is his only covering. Beneath it, in the Midwinter cold, he offers himself stripped for sacrifice, naked and ready. It is the ultimate act of royal kenosis: the voluntary self-emptying of one who willingly gives his life for the people.

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Pagan News Beagle: Watery Wednesday, August 17

The occult makes its way into the art world. Wiccans participate in a multifaith prayer circle. And A look at how to teach Heathenry to children. It's Watery Wednesday, our weekly segment on news about the Pagan community from around the world! All this and more for the Pagan News Beagle!

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Postmaster Announces New Pagan Holiday Stamps

AP: Washington, DC

The Postmaster General announced today the upcoming release of a series of stamps commemorating the eight holidays celebrated by the vast majority of contemporary pagans.

"Pagans have been an integral part of this nation since its founding and before," said Postmaster Tamar Penrose, acting head of the US Postal Service. "It's time and high time for such a public acknowledgement."

The stamps will be released later this year on November 1, the ancient Celtic holiday of Samhain, celebrated by many contemporary pagans as their New Year.

The release coincides with the opening of the Smithsonian's new exhibit, "Pagan America: The First 400 Years." The exhibit will include the unveiling of the original prototypes for the stamps.

The prototypes were created by the Minneapolis Collective of Pagan Artists (MCPA) which, since its founding in 2013, has spearheaded the mainstreaming of pagan art and culture into American consciousness. It was the MCPA that first vetted the idea to the Postal Service.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Mike Denning
    Mike Denning says #
    A real stamp though. http://www.collectgbstamps.co.uk/explore/years/?year=1981 By the way did the American readers really miss t
  • Dawn Love
    Dawn Love says #
    I believe a lot of us just got so excited by the headline of the post we didn't look closely at the picture until the obvious (and
  • Lokisgodhi
    Lokisgodhi says #
    Steven Posch, I must protest! It's just sick and wrong to ever apologize for duping feeble minded morons who were taken in by a g
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    First, my thanks to everyone who took the time to read and comment. Clearly, I need to get out of the Broomstick Ghetto more (but
  • Dawn Love
    Dawn Love says #
    The "joke" is funnier when everyone is in on it. Using a reference so obscure that newer Pagans possibly won't understand it is ex

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