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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Pagan Culture

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Pagan Pride (or: We Did It First)

A while back I had a call from my friend and colleague, Macha Nightmare. She'd gotten a new book deal and was looking for reasons to feel good about being pagan. As is usual in these situations, she was consulting with her peers. That's kind of how elder-ocracies like the paganisms tend to work.

“Well, we did a lot of things first,” I said.

 “Like what?” she asked.

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“The very same people who “can’t afford” to donate to a Neopagan temple, community center, website, or other organization on a regular basis have no problem finding the money to buy science fiction books, videotapes, DVDs, game cartridges, music CDs, comics, beer, pizza, cigarettes, movie tickets, necklaces, earrings, bracelets, crystals, robes, capes, etc.  -- Isaac Bonewits.

     In issue #28 of Witches and Pagans magazine columnist John Michael Greer wrote an article titled, “A Bad Case of Methodist Envy: Copying Christian models of clergy is a Pagan dead end.” In this essay Greer recommends against Pagan clergy and specifically full time compensated clergy. I would like to note that I have admired many of Greer’s books especially Inside a Magical Lodge, A World Full of Gods, and Druidry Handbook; however, I can simultaneously admire his work and disagree with some of his thoughts. 

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  • Anna M.H.
    Anna M.H. says #
    While I am, in general, a big fan of Greer's, I really disagree with his point of view on this, and feel you made many good points

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

Witches (along with many other denominations of Paganism) view sex as sacred. 

The Charge of the Goddess says that all acts of love and pleasure are rituals of the Goddess, and not only do I believe that to be true, it's one of the things that drew me to this religion.  In many ways, we're more open about sex (some of us say that we're more "sex positive") than the members of many/most other religions.  Similarly, we're more likely to be quite accepting of QLTBG, etc. sex/sexuality/identity, polyamory, public nudity, and various less-than-mainstream forms of sexual expression than the members of many other religions.  Our on-line discussions and our festivals and conferences often reflect this reality. 

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • janelle
    janelle says #
    The "sign" I have in mind is really too sad to be an open. The abuse of minors aught to be a wake up call to the community to addr
  • janelle
    janelle says #
    Why feel the need to insist that paganism is sex positive? Especially at a time like this. It begs so many questions. Which Pagani
  • Diotima
    Diotima says #
    Not every criticism has to be explicit, Max. I saw the criticism as implicit in the context. It seemed pretty clear to me that sh
  • Max Dashu
    Max Dashu says #
    I read your post perfectly well the first time. Feminazi is an offensive slur that is used to insult women on the regular. Your us
  • Hec
    Hec says #
    Max, The sentence says: "Third, I'd like to suggest that we all consider that those who want to discuss ways to make Pagan even

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
The Magick Jukebox

Merry Meet! I am David Banach (pronounced like ganache, but with 20% less chocolate.), a new contributor to PaganSquare.com and Witches and Pagans.

I am an eclectic Pagan living in the greater Charleston, South Carolina area of the Unites States. I began my journey on the Pagan path about 1995 when I discovered that there were more ideas and paths to follow than the one I had been told was the only way. I studied new age philosophy and spiritualism until I discovered Paganism about 2000. I attended my first ritual on New Year's Eve, 2000. Since then, I have studied eclectic Wicca, Druidry, a small amount of Shamanism, and some Asatru.

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  • debra strasser
    debra strasser says #
    I enjoy your podcast and I appreciate your hard work.
Pagan Culture and Experience: Definitions and Practice

Who gets the right to define you? To label you? Is that right solely your own, or does it belong in some measure to the culture with which you identify? I've considered this question for a long time, and I've concluded that there's no easy answer.

I've long been an advocate for the principle of self-identification: If you choose to identify yourself in specific terms, who are others to challenge it? But things really aren't that simple, are they? What about frauds who have ulterior motives for adopting a label? What about people who don't really understand what the label means?

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  • Samaire Provost
    Samaire Provost says #
    Nope, not at all awkward, Steve
  • Stifyn Emrys
    Stifyn Emrys says #
    Not awkward at all, Samaire. I'm sitting right across the table from you!
  • Samaire Provost
    Samaire Provost says #
    Well isn't this an awkward meeting
  • Stifyn Emrys
    Stifyn Emrys says #
    Thanks, Joe.
  • Joseph Merlin Nichter
    Joseph Merlin Nichter says #
    This is some of the best work I've seen on the topic.
All Acts of Love & Pleasure Are Her Rituals: In Defense of Polyamory

A couple of weeks ago, I posted an article from the BBC to my Facebook page about polyamory, which I thought was a very intelligent and sensitive article that portrayed how it works with honesty and authenticity.  A few of my more supportive friends re-posted it, which I appreciate, either because they are poly or poly-friendly.  One friend of mine made a reference to it and promptly took it to task on her page.  I stumbled across it and was a little hurt.  So this was my reply . . .

Hi, I'll take up your challenge! I am the original source of this article in the current community. I posted it because I am polyamorous and happy in this choice, and at a place in my life where I feel, to be authentic and genuinely loving and respectful of my partners, I need to be "out" about it. I think I'm going to take the points on individually here, and I'm going to take the time to challenge them because you can't just say, "Oh, I think that anyone who is not monogamous is cheating, lying, jealous, irresponsible, incapable of intimacy and unfulfilled in their relationships . . . but that's just my view on it" like it makes these statements anything less than they are, which are judgmental character slurs. Granted, I recognize that this appears to be what the rest of the world thinks (and notice the contradictory nature of a couple of those statements when phrased as bluntly as that, which of course means that both simply cannot be true,) so I relish this opportunity to help the enlightened people who are our mutual friends and associates understand something that may otherwise confuse them. And I hope to build understanding with you as well, since you are a loving and giving person and I am sure that this view of condemnation stems from either misconception (which is only to be expected in our compulsorily monogamous, heterosexist culture, because how would anyone have ever been shown another example other than what they've been taught?) or a bad experience (which, again, is fair, but just as one should not assume that all people of a particular group are jerks because one beat you up in high school, one should not assume that all polyamorous relationships are bad ones - though of course, some are, just like in any other relationship.) Please understand that I do not mean to say that you, or anyone else here is a judgmental person; indeed, metaphysical people tend to be refreshingly open-minded. I phrased things the way I did to point out how you may feel you have been coming from a place of love and acceptance in this, but these are not really loving and accepting statements you are making.

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  • Sarah Eccles
    Sarah Eccles says #
    Hi, I'm the Sarah mentioned in the BBC article you linked and I'm glad you liked it. One of the big things I didn't mention in the
  • Sable Aradia
    Sable Aradia says #
    Sarah, I am delighted to see you here! Thanks for telling your story to BBC so that we can all be more out, and thanks also for y
  • Sarah Eccles
    Sarah Eccles says #
    Just added you on Twitter. I'm Limnaia.
  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Ms. Aradia, Thank you for sharing your story with us. I've read several polemics on the internet, by Pagans, against polyamory. I

Posted by on in Studies Blogs
Pagan Values, Pagan Morals

Please excuse the delay of our intended post on the supernatural. That will come next month. However, due to the Pagan Values Blogject event this month, I have decided to weigh in on the topic.

I have previously touched this matter in some of my previous Arkadian Anvil posts: Better than Belief, Evil, Ethics and Freedom, and God’s Boredom or Why we are not Enlightened. . .

But today I wish to look directly at the idea of values through the lens of ethics and morality. . .

If we want to discuss Pagan values first we need go back to a much older mode of thought. To do that we need to first separate Ethics from Morals.

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  • Stifyn Emrys
    Stifyn Emrys says #
    Thank you for your insights. I enjoyed this piece.

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