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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Pagan Fiction
Post-Apocalypse Pagan Fiction II: The 70s, 80s, and 90s

Marvin Kaye and Parke Godwin, Masters of Solitude (1978)

After an invasion from China destroys the US, the megalopolis that covers the East Coast walls itself off from the wilderness to the West, where deer-like witches breed for psychic skills and create a genuine American witchery. Part of the fun is seeing what witch vocabulary might turn into in a few hundred years or so. (I don't need lep or a thammy to wish you a happy Grannog.) But those nasty coal-digging Kriss just keep cooking up toxic bugs to kill off the evil devil-worshipers. What to do?

Favorite line: “Who you callin' 'cowan'?”

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Gerhard Hauptmann, The Island of the Great Mother (German Edition: Die Insel der grossen Mutter) (1925)

A boatload of women, but no men, are shipwrecked on a tropical island paradise. Together they create a flourishing women's civilization. One by one, by some mysterious property of the island itself, the women begin to become pregnant. Catch: half the children are girls, half boys. What to do with the boys?

A troubling, insightful, and prophetic novel.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

Confession: pagan post-apocalyptic fiction is one of my guilty pleasures. You know: civilization as we know it falls apart and it's up to the witches to rebuild. There's a surprising amount of it (for a sub-genre of a sub-genre of a sub-genre), and it offers us as a community a way to reflect on what a pagan future might look like.

I'm currently reading the latest installment in what is surely the most successful of the entire franchise: S. M. Stirling's Dies the Fire series. (Premise: on All Snakes' Day—March 17—1999 all the machines stop. Everything falls apart. The witches—among others—rebuild.) Ignore the title-by-Disney (The Golden Princess, wince. Not to mention the cover art: not just cheese, but stinky cheese. It's hard to be reading a book I'm ashamed to be seen with in public); as popular fiction goes, this is actually well-written, nicely-observed, and thoughtful stuff (on which, more in the future).

Our story so far: It's 2044. Our three principles have been having the same dream for the past three nights. One remarks, as if citing a quotation known to them all, “Once is coincidence, twice can be happenstance....” and her friend finishes, “The third time is either enemy action, or someone sending you a message” (245).

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Post-apocalypse scenarios strike me as worth exploring because they're a very real likelihood. As oil runs out and we see the incr
  • Stephen M. Stirling
    Stephen M. Stirling says #
    Post-apocalyptic pagans make a lot of sense. When the going gets weird, the weird get going, as one of the characters says... 8-)
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Hmm, define "legit." Still, it surprises me just how many books fit into this genre. I'll post a list of what I've found soon. The
  • Lee Pike
    Lee Pike says #
    "pagan post-apocalyptic fiction" is a legit genre? WOW! I am a sucker for stinky cheese covers. Adding this to my to-read list and
  • Stephen M. Stirling
    Stephen M. Stirling says #
    Alas, I'm totally powerless about the covers. I agree certain aspects were unfortunate -- the mail bodice, holding the katana edg
Pagan News Beagle July 14

It's Airy Monday, and we've got stories on Ronald Hutton, Paganism in fiction, and how religious scholars are starting to grapple with the growing number of people not affiliated with any "recognized" religion.

An academic review of by Ethan Doyle White of Hutton's recent (May 2014) book "Pagan Britainn" http://moses.creighton.edu/jrs/2014/2014-29.pdf

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Hello there!  Once again I only had one entry so she got the books!  Here's my Google Hangouts on Air video revealing the winner and talking about the next giveaway:

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

b2ap3_thumbnail_beltanycover.jpg

Title: The Ruin of Beltany Ring: A Collection of Pagan Poems and Tales

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Rebecca Buchanan
    Rebecca Buchanan says #
    @Shirl: *blinks innocently* Yeah, okay; some kind of anniversary edition of Eternal Haunted Summer is a good idea. Just a matter o
  • Shirl Sazynski
    Shirl Sazynski says #
    ...maybe the timing would be better now for someone else to release a similar project. It's five years later, and a LOT of pop cul
  • Anne Newkirk Niven
    Anne Newkirk Niven says #
    Oh, honey, I'd love to. But after the financial drubbing I (and Llewellyn, too) took on this book http://www.amazon.com/The-Pagan-
  • Anne Newkirk Niven
    Anne Newkirk Niven says #
    I've been remiss not to mention Deborah Blake! I'm sure I'll think of more folks over time.
  • Rebecca Buchanan
    Rebecca Buchanan says #
    Maaaybe a themed w&p issue on modern Pagan/polytheist literature ...? *big puppy dog eyes*

Posted by on in Studies Blogs
Walpurgisnacht

Walther knew.  But he could not resist,what ten-year-old could?  Every year was the same.  Grandmother Dunkelhaus would shake her finger at him and warn, “Walpurgisnacht, the devil’s night—you stay indoors.  Devils,witches, ghosts—they come, they get little boys, eat you.”  Then she would snap together her shiny wooden teeth—clack!—as if she knew the flights of witches first hand.

 

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