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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in plantmagic

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
The Fairy Maids of February

While the days are noticeably longer, February often brings some of the fiercest winter weather making us long for spring and warmer days. One of the earliest flowers to venture into the bleak landscape is the snowdrop. Not waiting for clear ground, this little white flower often comes up through a blanket of snow.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Plant Magic in Winter

At this time of year when there’s not much to do in the garden or find in the wild, houseplants become the focus for plant magic.

The spider plant (Chlorophytum comosum) has been popular since forever, which is no wonder because it is so easy to care for. This plant gets its name from its spider-like appearance and its spiderettes (babies) that dangle from the mother plant like little spiders on a web. The spiderettes start out as small, white flowers. Once they develop roots, they can be planted to start a whole new colony of spiders. Also known as the ribbon plant, their ribbon-like leaves can be solid green or variegated. In addition to adding a splash of interest to a room, spider plants are good for clearing impurities from indoor air.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
A Pagan Perspective on the Poinsettia

As the wheel of the year makes its final turn and begins a new cycle, most plants have faded but evergreens live up to their name. They were considered sacred because they didn’t seem to die each year. Bringing evergreens indoors embodied the reborn spirit of the Green Man. With sacred trees, mistletoe, and other plants taken into the home, it is no accident that this is a magical time of year.

As a time of transformation, Yule celebrates the return of the sun/son, which brings hope and the promise of ongoing life. While the Celts had established Samhain as the beginning of the New Year, tenth-century Norse Pagans changed their new year to Yule to coincide with the solar cycle.

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The Dog Days of Summer: As Above, So Below

The period from early July to mid-August marks the dog days of summer, which were named for Sirius, the Dog Star, the brightest star in the sky. In ancient times, it rose just before the sun during the hottest period of the year. In Egypt, the rising of Sirius marked the annual flooding of the Nile. Because the river water rejuvenated the land bringing it back to life, this occasion was associated with the return from the dead of the god Osiris.

Sirius is part of the constellation Canis Major, the Great Dog, and according to Greek myth, it represented one of the hunting dogs of Orion. Canis Minor, the Little Dog, represents the other one. I like to think of these constellations as guard dogs watching over us.

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Recent comment in this post - Show all comments
  • Carol P. Christ
    Carol P. Christ says #
    Been seeing a very big star in the night sky of late, thanks for identifying it, I thought it was a planet. Not having researched

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Magic in the Herb Garden

 Summer is a time to have fun outdoors and enjoy the beauty of the green world. With so many plants growing and blooming, there is magic aplenty in our own backyards. Even if you live in a city, you can enjoy the magic of herbs grown on a windowsill. Alternatively, buy cut herbs at a farmers’ market or dried ones at a health food stores.

With a strong spicy aroma, it is probably no surprise that basil (Ocimum basilicum) is one of the most popular herbs today. It was also favored in ancient times. The Egyptians, Greeks, and Romans used basil for medicinal and culinary purposes. During the Middle Ages, sprigs of basil were scattered on floors to freshen and clear the air as well as to protect against witches.

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