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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in seidhr
Nine Weeks of Energy Clearing: Week 2- The Media Detox (Reclaiming Your Mind, Will and Relationship with the Gods), Pt. 1

(For the next few weeks through Eostre, in preparation for Spring Equinox’s energies of renewal, I’m focusing this blog on energetically clearing our lives. Last week we began with looking at the Wyrd (Karma) of Used Things— examining the fate patterns attached to previously owned stuff.)


 You are your thoughts. Thoughts manifest your reality. But how many of those thoughts are really your own?

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  • Bjarni Böðvarr
    Bjarni Böðvarr says #
    Shirl, i am sorry to contact you this way, but please contact me ASAP it concerns SW Frithmoot 2 years ago.
  • J'Karrah
    J'Karrah says #
    Some great advice. I was please to see somethings I had already started doing (out of self defense!) on your list, and look forwa
  • Shirl Sazynski
    Shirl Sazynski says #
    Thanks! You're welcome.

One of the frequent questions I get from budding Heathens is "Where do I start?". After fielding two such questions in the same day from a divination client and prospective student, I began this series of articles. More resources can be found on my website.


 b2ap3_thumbnail_Shirl-Sazynski_Come-With-Me-Love_cropped.jpg

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This essay appears in Eternal Haunted Summer magazine, where it was originally published. It's part of my memoir about visionary experience.

b2ap3_thumbnail_shirl-sazynski_Sigyn-and-Loki_small.jpg

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  • Shirl Sazynski
    Shirl Sazynski says #
    Thanks, Jill. Having known Loki for awhile, he is definitely not evil. If you want to learn more, there's an excellent article ab
  • Jill Swift
    Jill Swift says #
    I have been very intrigued by Loki. I know its weird with the movies that are out and about, but for some weird reason,Loki was th
  • Shirl Sazynski
    Shirl Sazynski says #
    Good luck to you as well. (:

Posted by on in Paths Blogs

This blog post also appears in print with more photos in Sacred Hoop Issue #85.

b2ap3_thumbnail_Albuquerque-from-the-air_wikipedia.jpg
Central Albuquerque, New Mexico USA. Seen from the sky. Courtesy of Wikipedia.

"Look wide, and look far. Look upon your city. This is your community. These are your people, all of them. The people you know and the people you will never meet. Even the ones you don't like. Good or bad, rich or poor, status and class and family don't matter. Politics don't matter. They're still all your people.

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  • Greybeard
    Greybeard says #
    Thanks. I enjoyed the description of wandering in the hills near Albuquerque. I spent several years there and have hiked extensiv
  • Shirl Sazynski
    Shirl Sazynski says #
    You're welcome. Thanks for responding. Sounds like a fun wedding, Greybeard! And Jemez is gorgeous.
  • Shirl Sazynski
    Shirl Sazynski says #
    Thanks, Kimberly! I'd love to read those if you decide to share.
  • Kimberly Glaser
    Kimberly Glaser says #
    So beautiful! Makes me think of my own journal entries about Cerridwyn

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
On spinning and magic

Why do I spin? The question comes often enough from non-crafty people—which probably includes most people out there--who don't really even understand that there's a difference between spinning and weaving, and who just can't see the point of knitting a sweater or scarf (much less spinning the yarn in order to knit one) when you can buy one a lot cheaper at Walmart or the local mall. But I'm sure there are also a lot of spiritual types out there who read my blog and wonder why I—a spirit worker, and married to Odin for crying out loud—spend so much of my time spinning and prepping wool for spinning.

Not that I am equating myself with Her, but the question sort of begs me to invoke Frigga's name. Because, after all, She is married to Odin, and She spins—and actually, it was partly Her influence that prompted my obsession with the fiber arts in the first place. So, why does She do it? The reason She is so closely associated with spinning (and the Norns and Valkyries with weaving) has to be partly a mundane and culturally influenced one: in the past, as the majority of Walmart shoppers probably don't realize, spinning was not just an odd pastime for middle aged women, it was a necessity of life. There were no stores in which to buy clothing, but there were sheep, and flax, and nettles, and other sources of fiber, and one day people discovered that this fiber could to be twisted to form a strong thread that could then be woven into cloth to make garments and other useful items. (Knitting came much, much later.) But you needed a lot of thread to weave enough cloth for even a single garment, so spinners spent virtually every spare moment of their lives spinning, and because spinning is something that can be easily set down in order to tend a baby, and is not a dangerous activity to practice around children, spinning (and to a lesser extent, weaving) naturally fell into the domain of women.

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  • Eric Crouse
    Eric Crouse says #
    I've been spinning since 2010. It calls to me like no other. I have started to be more on the look out for stories regarding spi
  • Cathleen M. Collett
    Cathleen M. Collett says #
    I have been diagnosed (at sixty-five!) with the entity formerly know as Asperger's Syndrome. One characteristic of this is "stimm
  • Julia Glassman
    Julia Glassman says #
    Thanks for this wonderful article! I'm a passionate knitter and aspiring spinner, and I love learning about the connections betwee
  • Beth Wodandis
    Beth Wodandis says #
    Thank you--and I wish your wife many happy spinning hours with that wheel!
  • Terence P Ward
    Terence P Ward says #
    I've always been captivating by spinning, and I was thrilled when my wife finally found someone to put the spinning wheel she'd in

Posted by on in Studies Blogs
Meditations on Hávamál 1-4

Hávamál offers us a glimpse of a past that had already become somewhat nostalgic when a single hand transcribed the poem around 1270 CE.  As David A. H. Evans writes in the Viking Society for Northern Research’s edition of the verses, this second poem of the Elder Edda “is deservedly one of the most celebrated works to have survived from the early Norse world.” It’s full of gnomic advice that continues to be of interest—and application—to us in the modern world. Old Norse text via the Heimskringla Project.

1.    
Gáttir allar,
áðr gangi fram,
um skoðask skyli,
um skyggnast skyli,
því at óvíst er at vita,
hvar óvinir
sitja á fleti fyrir.

2.
Gefendr heilir!
Gestr er inn kominn,
hvar skal sitja sjá?
Mjök er bráðr,
sá er á bröndum skal
síns of freista frama.

3.
Elds er þörf,
þeims inn er kominn
ok á kné kalinn;
matar ok váða
er manni þörf,
þeim er hefr um fjall farit.

4.
Vatns er þörf,
þeim er til verðar kemr,
þerru ok þjóðlaðar,
góðs of æðis,
ef sér geta mætti,
orðs ok endrþögu.

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  • Byron Ballard
    Byron Ballard says #
    This is what I needed today. Blessings on your dear head, Laity.
  • Kate Laity
    Kate Laity says #
    You are most kind, my friend.

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