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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in spells

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Casting Love Spells: A Cautionary Tale

This post also appears at www.tarotbyhilary.com.

 

Once upon a time, a young foolish teenager cast a spell.

She cast a spell at one of the many power sites in the world, where all the elements meet in one place. Air, water, fire, and earth ... where the land meets the ocean. She found a pure white stone, and asked the Gods to bring to her a true love. She was tired of waiting, so she sought out a way to bring him to her. She held the stone in her left hand, and cast the love spell in the way that she was taught to cast it: without envisioning a specific person and without being unduly specific, because magic follows the path of least resistance, and magic often does not work in ways that humans understand or can anticipate. She held the stone firmly, and when she felt ready, she threw the stone out into the ocean, into the crest of a huge wave, and determined that the waves of the oceans constantly coming into shore would eventually bring love into her life.

It took three years and many relationships and coincidences for him to arrive.

How did she know that he was the one she asked the sea to bring to her?

His name means "from the sea."


 

I wrote this little “fairy tale” story back in 2007, when I still was with the person in question whose name meant “from the sea.” Yes, that young foolish teenager that cast the love spell was me, and yes, the story above (though flowery in language) really happened. Why am I writing about it now? That spell taught me very valuable lessons in how spell-casting really works.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
The Black Thread Charm

In 1841, Georg Waitz discovered two magic charms in a 9-10th century codex in the Cathedral Chapter library of Merseburg, the only surviving literary remnants of Old High German heathenry. In the second Merseburg charm, Woten heals a horse's sprain after other gods have failed.

Variants of this charm, with different gods and saints, survive all over northwestern Europe—the Germanies, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Scotland, Shetland, and the Hebrides—but a similar spell preserved from Vedic India suggests that it may be ancient of origin indeed.

The charm is of the type known to scholars as a historiola: what linguist Philip A. Shaw defines as “a charm in which a narrative is employed that in some way represents or symbolises the achievement of the desired outcome of the charm” (Shaw 62). Magic-workers have been harnessing the driving power of story to propel their charms for millennia; modern spell-smiths take note!

 The Old Craft version of the charm cited below invokes, as one would expect, the god of witches in his person of Wild Rider.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Zap the World!

65 years ago the number of new pagans in the world was negligible. Now we number (possibly) in the (low) tens of millions, in (probably) every country of the world. (Did you know that there are New Pagan movements in virtually all of the Turkic-speaking countries of Central Asia? G****e Tengrism.) (Tengri = Blue Father Sky.) In the course of the history of religions, that's really pretty remarkable. How in the world did it happen?

According to Sparky T. Rabbit, it's a spell.

Yes, folks, Gerald Gardner cast a spell and zap! Here we are.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    A tale lyrically told, Linette, and all the better for being true. I join my voice to yours.
  • Linette
    Linette says #
    When I was a kid, even a very little kid, I had this "thing" I did with the Universe. This very wonderful innate relationship wher

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Day 2 of the #13daysofmagic challenge

Today's #13daysofmagic spell is an anti-confusion spell. You can find this spell in the next volume of Modern Witch Magazine, which will be out this winter. 

There were some really great posts on the first day, here are just a few that really stuck out! You can see more by  searching #13daysfmagic on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram. 

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
#13daysofmagic

This year I thought it might be fun to gather some of my close friends and celebrate magic! Beginning October 19th join Jacki Smith from Coventry Creations, Author David Salisbury, Adam Sartwell and The Temple of Witchcraft, Storm Faerywolf from Blue Rose Faery, Black Rose Witchcraft, myself and others for our #13daysofmagic challenge! 

 

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  • Raven Song
    Raven Song says #
    I'm looking forward to this!!

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Don't Frack My Holy Well

Sisters, Brothers, can you spare me a spell?

Can you help me save sacred water in our holy wells?


We have been campaigning to prevent this since 2010 but the Tory government in Westminster that governs Northern Ireland is keen on fracking and have even mentioned the expansion of it in the Queens Speech in Parliament.


While we living in the Republic of Ireland have been painstakingly campaigned blockades county by county in legislation it looks as if the pollution that will honour no international borders on this single island is coming our way.


I live in the Cavan/Fermanagh border counties of Ireland eight miles from where Tamboran intends to start fracking test drills for fracking (hydraulic fracturing) shale gas over the next quarter. This landscape, originally settled by the Tuatha dé Danaan, Ireland's fairy race, is mostly limestone and bog, a network of underground streams, rivers and loughs. The River Shannon originates underground in the caves beneath Fermanagh's Cuilcagh Mountain before rising in the Republic of Ireland in Co. Cavan. The area's natural heritage is of enough international signficence to warrant Global Geopark status.

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  • Courtney Weber
    Courtney Weber says #
    Bee, we feel you here in NYC. We've been fighting for years to keep fracking out of our state. It is an uphill endeavor, sometimes

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

I'm not usually much one for spells and such, but a dear friend of mine is in a very dark place right now. If we lived in the same city, I'd mow his lawn or cook his dinner. But we don't; so I'm making him magic instead.

My friend is heathen, and Frey is his heart-god. Heathen is for me a second language, but the (admittedly controversial) identification of Vana-Frey with the Horned God of Witches gives me a port of entry. And indeed, at least one 17th-century Swedish witch confessed that she and her coven called the Devil “Frö (= Frey) (Runeberg 81). The trial is late enough that we cannot rule out the possibility of literary “contamination,” but even if this is the case, precedent is precedent. Interpretatio wiccana, anyone?

The spell is based on the famous passage from Hávamál about Óðinn's nine nights on the tree. While as a poem this may mark the piece as derivative, as a spell it sets up powerful resonances, like a jazz improvisation on a known tune.

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