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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Standing stones

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Moving the Longstones

I don't know how you go about moving standing stones where you live.

Here's what we do around here.

In these things, of course, it's always best to start in a sacred way.

Before the day's work begins, we gather around the stone. We lay out the eventual foundation offerings on the foot of the longstone. Then we pass around a horn of beer, and everyone takes a sip.

The rest of the beer we pour out over the stone.

Then we pack up the foundation offerings, and the day's work begins.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Tasha Halpert
    Tasha Halpert says #
    Wonderful! Thanks for sharing.
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    I should add that we've taken to doing the same little ceremony at the end of the work day, as well.
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    We're building a shrine at our regional pagan land sanctuary. The Stone will be the pivot point where Earth marries Sky, where Peo
  • Tasha Halpert
    Tasha Halpert says #
    Why are you moving them? just wondering...

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
A Little Samhain in Every Bealtaine

Posch, you pervert.

May Eve is days away, and you're writing about Samhain?

What are you trying to do, wreck us?

Au contraire. (And let me point out that our Southside friends and family are preparing for Samhain as I write this).

It's just that this new (to me) idea is so elegant, so true, that it simply won't wait.

I'm just now back from a warlocks' work weekend at Witch Country's Sweetwood sanctuary. We're building a shrine there in the woods below the circle.

This time around we began site preparation, and removed the standing stone that will be the centerpiece of the shrine, from its immemorial bed in the coulee (ravine) wall. The Bull Stone has now begun its long journey across the coulee and up the side of the hill.

But that's another story for another day. (Stay tuned.) In the process, we chopped down a number of young trees, both to clear the site and to provide us with rails and rollers.

You can't move a 1000-pound stone through the forest without doing some damage. Iacchus, Sweetwood's priest-in-residence and caretaker, remarked offhandedly that it's the custom there to offer at Samhain on behalf of all the lives that one has taken during the course of the year.

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13 Different Ways of Reverencing a Standing Stone
  1. Bow to it.

  2. Touch it.

  3. Kiss it.

  4. Embrace it.

  5. Anoint it.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Raising the Bull Stone

Why do they call it the Bull Stone?

Not difficult.

There's a golden bull buried underneath. That's why they call it the Bull Stone.

Well, that's what they say.

 

Recently the warlocks converged on Sweetwood Temenos in the heart of America's Witch Country, among the hollow hills of the Midwest's Driftless Area, to site the shrine that we'd like to build there.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Standing Stones

What's more pagan than a standing stone?

I say, let's raise them all over the place. Front yards, back yards, large, small, public, private, no matter. We need our standing stones. A landscape needs its standing stones. Shrines. Axes mundi. Herms. Facts on the ground.

Garland them, wreathe them, anoint them, rub them with ocher. Lay offerings at their feet. Wrap them (yes, I've seen it done) in strings of lights. Dance around them. Pray to them. Standing stones.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    When I was going to Virginia Commonwealth University back in the 80's there was a book on phallic stones in Japan. I just looked
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Sounds like a good ritual, Anthony. I'd love to be there! The ancient Semitic cultures were big on standing stones. Unlike Englis
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    When you asked what could be more pagan than setting up a standing stone. I immediately thought of the Biblical patriarch Jacob a
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Novelist Alan Garner (Brisingamen, Owl Service, et al.) writes that in the part of Cheshire he comes from, every standing stone ha
  • Linda Boeckhout
    Linda Boeckhout says #
    I love standing stones. They represent both cultural and geological history of the land (as they are often found where a glacier u
PaganNewsBeagle: Earthy Thursday July 17

Loads of earthy, Gaian stories today: ancient trees, blackberry wisdom, saving predators and pondering the vegan/carnivore ecological conundrum. Check them out below.

A yew tree in the corner of a Welsh churchyard is said to be 5,000 years old. Our Neolithic ancestors were as fascinated by it as we are.

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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Standing Stones and the Crow Woman

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