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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in summer
A Time to Plant, a Time to Harvest

It seems like summer just arrived and already it is on its way out. Today is Lughnasadh (Celtic) or Lammas (Germanic), the beginning of the harvest season in Western European tradition and the first day of autumn according to reckonings that count summer as starting from May. Traditionally, it’s a time for working the fields and baking the first bread of the new harvest.

As always we’ve gathered all of our related posts as well as those we found across the internet that we thought you might enjoy. Have fun!

--Aryós Héngwis

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Recent comment in this post - Show all comments
  • Christopher Ward
    Christopher Ward says #
    Shared thank you fer sharin Miss Karen awesome post

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Summer Moons

From ancient times, humanity has named its surroundings.  Was this to create a connection, feel more in control or just a way to identify what could be at times an unfriendly environment?  We probably will never know for certain but one of the things we do have are remnants of their naming like the full moon names.  These names give us a hint into how ancient peoples identified with their surroundings and tracked their seasons.

For early agricultural communities, June began a slow trickle of early crops like strawberries.  Imagine going all winter with little to no fresh fruits or vegetables.  Perhaps the community even ran low enough on food that hunger was a part of daily life.  Then to work all spring to get crops in the ground so next winter you hoped not to fall short.  Then June comes and the creamy flowers of strawberry plants indicates soon the first red berries will be there.  Imagine how much sweeter these taste after struggling for enough food.  Naturally as this important fresh food became available, the people would logically name the full moon strawberry. This name comes from both Celtic and Algonquin lineage so perhaps it was a staple and a pleasure for both groups.  Was it because it was one of the first crops or because the flowers of this plant are the same milky white color as the moon?  Probably we will never know. 

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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Lunasa Dreamtime

It is Lunasa in a week's time. Here in Ireland the hints of autumn have come early. The billberries are already plump. My husband has cut down some rye grass for me to make harvest decorations. The rowan berries are already reddening.  Everything in nature feels a bit rushing the season, early, out of sync somehow. The actual weather has been bucking previous summer trends as well.  We have had long spells without heavy rain, only soft smatterings, more extended bursts of sunshine than unusual, but also warmer and more humid spells, with lots of oppressive low cloud. Which may not be so unusual since our celestial, astrological weather is pretty maverick right now, too. But this summer season has also felt like an extended dreamtime to me.

I know that in some places readers are drowning in record rainfall. My friend in Arizona has endured 50C/120F days with only water condensers to cool them down. The hot, humid NE USA means my friend with MS is very grateful for supermarkets that are open 24/7; she has to avoid the heat of the day to do shopping since that might trigger an episode.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Summertime, and the Living is Easy

I’ve had a bit of writer’s block the past several weeks. I was doing fine till just before Beltane, and then…nothing.

 

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Dark Side of the Year

We're past Midsummer and into the heat of summer.  A friend of mine mentioned we're on the dark side of the year now because each day we have a little less light.  The phrase stuck with me as I worked through my days.

Every day we shift to a minute or two less of light.  The clock is ticking, ticking, ticking to remind us to finish whatever our goals are for this year.  How many times have you heard someone say - where did the year go or where did the month go?  

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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Aine, Celtic Summer Goddess

Aine, (pronounced AW-neh), was originally worshipped as a Sun Goddess. Like so many Celtic goddesses and gods, Aine has assumed many other roles over the years, being seen as a Moon Goddess, a Goddess of Love, a Fertility Goddess, a Healing Goddess, and a Sovereignty Goddess. Aine is also known as a Faery Queen. She is often called Aine, Goddess of Love, Light, and Fertility. Her name means “brightness, glow, joy, radiance; splendor, glory, fame” and she is associated with the abundance of summer.

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Thou Art Goddess: Claiming Your Inner Goddess in the Summer Season

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Christopher Ward
    Christopher Ward says #
    Awesome article Mrs. Karen thank you fer sharin it
  • Karen Clark
    Karen Clark says #
    Why, you're very welcome Christopher. It's a real pleasure to write for SageWomam.
  • Cindy Freeman
    Cindy Freeman says #
    I LOVE this. For most of my life, I've only allowed myself to feel these things on rare occasions. It's not "logical" or "rational
  • Karen Clark
    Karen Clark says #
    You are so welcome Cindy. Yes to tapping into your feminine soul! Blessings!
  • Karen Clark
    Karen Clark says #
    You're welcome! And thanks for the wonderful comment.

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