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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in symbolism
Gun Violence: When Humans Become Mere Avatars

A Facebook friend shared a map and article about gun violence in America. She lamented that she's "always dreamed of living abroad and never has that desire been greater than now".

Gun map 500

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  • Janet Boyer
    Janet Boyer says #
    HAHAHA! I hear ya! When I teach Tarot (in person or through my books) I always tell them there IS no "right way" to learn the card
  • Francesca De Grandis
    Francesca De Grandis says #
    Ha ha Ha ha ha! Though I teach traditional Tarot interpretations, I also want my students to trust their own unique interpretation
  • Janet Boyer
    Janet Boyer says #
    Too funny! All good teachers "throw back" questions to their students instead of telling them what to think. I bet you DID teach t
  • Francesca De Grandis
    Francesca De Grandis says #
    Thank you. I hope I did. If you celebration Brid, have a great one!
  • Janet Boyer
    Janet Boyer says #
    Oh, that's right! Today's her day.

Joseph Bloch has invited us to participate in a July Blogfest by writing about cultural appropriation.

I'm a Jungian and an eclectic Neopagan, which means that I am doubly vulnerable to charges of cultural appropriation.  Jungianism and eclectic Neopaganism are criticized for their borrowing of symbols from other cultures for a variety of reasons.  First, the removal of religious symbols and practices from their cultural context may be seen as trivializing.  Second, the adoption of the traditions and practices of another culture may be seen as a form of cultural theft, and another form of Western colonialism.  In many cases, these charges are well-founded, but I don't think it is fair or accurate to condemn eclecticism automatically as either trivializing or as cultural theft.

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  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    I may not share your theological views, but as a Platonist I'm impressed with your rigorous logic and willingness to share your be
  • John Halstead
    John Halstead says #
    Wow! Hadn't heard about the Lesbos lawsuit! Those are exactly the right questions: where do we draw the line? and who gets to de

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

Bulls.  Big, strong, temperamental creatures that have had loomed large in man’s past.  Bull jumping, bull baiting, bull fights and running of the bulls are events where they were, and in some cases still are, featured.  They were used in the form of oxen to pull plows and carts.  Their virility kept up herds, generating wealth for their owners. In some areas, placing a bull head above a door gives protection and luck much like the horse shoe.  As sacrifices, few animals were more costly.  From them we get the terms ‘seeing red’ and ‘bull-headed’.  A lot of myths feature bulls, even modern myths like Paul Bunyan and his blue ox.  In some cultures, earthquakes are blamed on a rowdy celestial bull believed to have the world upon its horns.  A lot of masculine divinities, particularly those of the sun and the sky, are associated with bulls.

b2ap3_thumbnail_Minoan_Head_Bull_-_Heraklion_Archaeological_Museum.jpg

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  • Melia Brokaw
    Melia Brokaw says #
    I saw that but again I wonder if those are bulls or cows with horns. Sounds like an interesting temple!
  • Emily Mills
    Emily Mills says #
    Interesting post and great list thanks! I follow the research done at Catal Huyuk; their dig season just started back up, so I've
  • Stifyn Emrys
    Stifyn Emrys says #
    Great informational post. Odd coincidence: My wife and I were just talking about Paul Bunyan and Babe today.
  • Melia Brokaw
    Melia Brokaw says #
    Paul and Blue have been popping out at me a lot lately...I've been trying to figure out why. Thanks!
  • Samantha Lahlali
    Samantha Lahlali says #
    In Hellenic polytheism there is also Apollon who has perhaps a less recognized connection among oxen and cattle. Pausanias tells u

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
The Spider and I

Yesterday I did what I normally do in the afternoon- bring the laundry in from off the wash-line. I reach for a shirt, and there is a spider that has spun a delicate web between it and another shirt. Grabbing a small stick, I carefully pick it off its web and place it on a branch. See, I’m not scared of spiders.

Getting to the final bit of laundry, I unpeg a long black skirt off the line and drape it over my arm. Out the corner of my eye I notice something large and greyish rubbing against me. I think nothing of it. As I plop the skirt in the laundry basket, the greyish thing moves and realisation dawns.

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  • D. R. Bartlette
    D. R. Bartlette says #
    How interesting...right after posting this I had a rather intense little spider encounter...I wrote about it on my blog, if you ca
  • Bronwyn Katzke
    Bronwyn Katzke says #
    Thank you, I'm glad you enjoyed it. Spider has shown up in my life a few times before, but each time the personal meaning has been
  • D. R. Bartlette
    D. R. Bartlette says #
    What a lovely post! For most of my early Pagan years, Spider was my totem. I also see their beauty and complexity as something to

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

Symbols are motifs, letters, numbers, figures and characters that represent something else.

Ultimately, symbols are short-cuts. Like the tip of the funnel, they lead to something wider and deeper. But the entrance to that "biggerness" lies at the point of symbol.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

With Thanksgiving around the corner, I thought it would be fun to explore one of the ubiquitous symbols of the season: the cornucopia.

a1sx2_Thumbnail1_Abundtia-400.jpg

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

It can be difficult to discover personal meaning and purpose when we don't zoom out to get a big picture of the patterns and symbols in our life. One way we can discover the patterns and purposes of our life is by discerning prevalent Archetypes and symbols.

What is an archetype? An archetype is a template or original pattern from which copies are made. Psychologist Carl Jung, author Joseph Campbell, storyteller/author Clarissa Pinkola Estes, psychologist Jean Shinonda-Bolen and others are among those that have brought the concept of Archetypes into our consciousness. 

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  • Janet Boyer
    Janet Boyer says #
    Thanks for further sharing your perspective, John!
  • Janet Boyer
    Janet Boyer says #
    Hi John, As I mentioned in my post, others have built upon what Jung postulated (Myss, Shinoda Bolen, Carol Pearson etc.). concer
  • John Halstead
    John Halstead says #
    Actually, most Pagan and New Age authors who draw on Jung, do not build on his ideas, but rather present a stripped down version o
  • John Halstead
    John Halstead says #
    Technically, for Jung archetypes are not "patterns that are universally recognized [...] in myths, fairy tales, literature, and mo

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