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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in symbolism

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
The Spider and I

Yesterday I did what I normally do in the afternoon- bring the laundry in from off the wash-line. I reach for a shirt, and there is a spider that has spun a delicate web between it and another shirt. Grabbing a small stick, I carefully pick it off its web and place it on a branch. See, I’m not scared of spiders.

Getting to the final bit of laundry, I unpeg a long black skirt off the line and drape it over my arm. Out the corner of my eye I notice something large and greyish rubbing against me. I think nothing of it. As I plop the skirt in the laundry basket, the greyish thing moves and realisation dawns.

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  • D. R. Bartlette
    D. R. Bartlette says #
    How interesting...right after posting this I had a rather intense little spider encounter...I wrote about it on my blog, if you ca
  • Bronwyn Katzke
    Bronwyn Katzke says #
    Thank you, I'm glad you enjoyed it. Spider has shown up in my life a few times before, but each time the personal meaning has been
  • D. R. Bartlette
    D. R. Bartlette says #
    What a lovely post! For most of my early Pagan years, Spider was my totem. I also see their beauty and complexity as something to

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

Symbols are motifs, letters, numbers, figures and characters that represent something else.

Ultimately, symbols are short-cuts. Like the tip of the funnel, they lead to something wider and deeper. But the entrance to that "biggerness" lies at the point of symbol.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

With Thanksgiving around the corner, I thought it would be fun to explore one of the ubiquitous symbols of the season: the cornucopia.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

It can be difficult to discover personal meaning and purpose when we don't zoom out to get a big picture of the patterns and symbols in our life. One way we can discover the patterns and purposes of our life is by discerning prevalent Archetypes and symbols.

What is an archetype? An archetype is a template or original pattern from which copies are made. Psychologist Carl Jung, author Joseph Campbell, storyteller/author Clarissa Pinkola Estes, psychologist Jean Shinonda-Bolen and others are among those that have brought the concept of Archetypes into our consciousness. 

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  • Janet Boyer
    Janet Boyer says #
    Thanks for further sharing your perspective, John!
  • Janet Boyer
    Janet Boyer says #
    Hi John, As I mentioned in my post, others have built upon what Jung postulated (Myss, Shinoda Bolen, Carol Pearson etc.). concer
  • John Halstead
    John Halstead says #
    Actually, most Pagan and New Age authors who draw on Jung, do not build on his ideas, but rather present a stripped down version o
  • John Halstead
    John Halstead says #
    Technically, for Jung archetypes are not "patterns that are universally recognized [...] in myths, fairy tales, literature, and mo

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

Like many Pagans, I am a lover of literature. It was in books that I first discovered the Gods. I devoured tales of Artemis and Apollo and Isis and Anubis and Brigid. And -- like many -- the first thing I did after my (re)discovery of the Gods was build an altar.

I felt most drawn to the Hellenic Gods, but I had no real guidelines for the proper construction of a Greek-style altar. I found a basic diagram in Scott Cunningham's Wicca: A Guide for the Solitary Practitioner, and used that as a template: bust of Apollo and a gold candle on the right, bust of Artemis and a silver candle on the left, bowl of dried flowers, small cup of earth, small cup of water.

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs

Like the Pentagram of Wicca and Witchcraft, and the Mjölnir of Asatru, Hellenismos has its own symbols. Symbols are used for a couple of reasons; identification, for one. When I see someone wearing a pentagram, I almost automatically assume they are Pagan as well. Flashing my pentagram ring usually gets me a smile and a knowing glance. I like those encounters.

Although the chances of running into another Greek Recon are slim here in the Netherlands, I am invested in the symbols of Hellenismos none the less. But what are they? Besides the obvious representations of the Theoi, there are a few, but we'll look into the Theoi first. Most Greek Gods and Goddesses are associated with a specific animal or item. Wearing Their favored symbols on a necklace of bracelet is a good way to feel closer to Them. From myth, this is a (non-exhaustive) list of the Theoi and their favored animals.

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  • Joseph Bloch
    Joseph Bloch says #
    I've always been fond of the dodecahedron (twelve-sided Platonic solid) in relation to Classical paganism. It's referenced by Plat

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Click for full description.
©1990 by U.S. Games Systems, Inc

Today we're going to explore the abundance of symbols within the enigmatic High Priestess Tarot card from the Rider-Waite-Smith tradition.

 

Click for full description.Number 2 – Balance; Yin/Yang; Opposites Unified (Taoism); "Good Things Comes in Pairs" (Chinese philosophy); Diversity (Pythagoras); Potential for Disorder/Evil (Pythagoras); Balance; Duality; Opposition

 

Click for full description.Black and White Pillars – As the number 2, black and white signifies duality—yin/yang, dark/light, feminine/masculine, severity/mercy, passive/aggressive, esoteric/exoteric, heart/mind, intuition/logic and so on. Toggling back and forth, they are "either/or". However, the central veil featuring pomegranates and the date palm tree connects the two pillars—suggesting integration and the union of opposites. The two pillars, when joined by the veil, signify "both".

 

B and J – In I Kings 7 (Old Testament), the author offers a detailed description of Solomon's temple, including the pillars that marked the entrance. Verse 21 states: "Then he set up the pillars by the vestibule of the temple; he set up the pillar on the right and called its name Jachin, and he set up the pillar on the left and called its name Boaz." (NKJV) In Hebrew, Jachin means "He Shall Establish", while Boaz means "In It Is Strength".

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  • Janet Boyer
    Janet Boyer says #
    Just saw your post, Lisa! Fascinating insight. Thank you for mentioning this and posting the link!
  • Lisa Allen
    Lisa Allen says #
    Excellent blog post Janet! May I also mention that the Golden Crescent may also refer to the Crescent of Venus (aka the Horns of
  • Janet Boyer
    Janet Boyer says #
    You got it, Jeff!
  • Jeff Fradley
    Jeff Fradley says #
    I would like to see The Hermit or The Magician!
  • Janet Boyer
    Janet Boyer says #
    Thanks, Angel! As Prentiss Gates says in the movie How to Frame a Figg: Message received and noted!

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