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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in vanatru

Posted by on in Paths Blogs

(other than Frey, Freya, Njord and Nerthus)

Byggvir and Beyla. Byggvir possibly means “barley”, and Beyla means “bee”. Whether these two names translate exactly or not, They are a couple who travel with Frey, and are in charge of taking care of his household and are servants of his. Gnosis says that Byggvir is Bull tribe Vanir, and Beyla of the Bee tribe.

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs

b2ap3_thumbnail_frey_freya--.png(an excerpt from my book, Visions of Vanaheim)

The Vanir are one of three groups of gods in the Germanic pantheon (the others being Aesir and Jotnar/Rokkr), originating from the world of Vanaheim, and commonly holding domain over nature, fertility, and magic.

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs

b2ap3_thumbnail_478px-Freya_by_Johannes_Gehrts.jpgFreya was the first deity I ever connected with in a meaningful way, back in 1996. Coming into Germanic paganism via Freya, I took things at face value and without a deeper look at the history and the context of archaeology until many years later when I did so out of necessity to shed some light on things I was experiencing. Most forms of Germanic paganism treat the Aesir and Vanir as a package deal with heavy emphasis on the Aesir.

So for many years, I attempted to reach out to the Aesir because I thought I "should". From the get-go, the Aesir were... not really a good fit. The gods that interested me all had ties to the nature and the land, and the Aesir... mostly didn't. Sure, Odin is connected with wind and its fury, and Thor is thunder, but... no. The macho-war energy surrounding the Aesir (while this is not all they are, obviously) did not feel like "my gods". Yet, I spent years trying to connect to the Aesir, with crickets, mostly, and occasional blips on the radar, until finally, some things happened where I was told to stop.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Beth Lynch
    Beth Lynch says #
    Yes, exactly! Deep-minded is an often forgotten epithet of Thor's; He even has a connection with seidhr, for some (and experience
  • Nornoriel Lokason
    Nornoriel Lokason says #
    Yeah I definitely see the difference between the Aesir and Vanir as more cultural than racial, for the same reason. As an aside,
  • Beth Lynch
    Beth Lynch says #
    The idea of the Vanir as the anti-Aesir annoys me, too. Equally, the Aesir are not the anti-Vanir, and are not merely gods of mac
  • Nornoriel Lokason
    Nornoriel Lokason says #
    I cannot click "like" hard enough on this comment. While I have always perceived the Aesir as being more inherently martial tha

Posted by on in Paths Blogs

b2ap3_thumbnail_Coast_Range_Trees_Lane_County_Oregon_scenic_images_lanDA0069.jpgSo the words "Vanir" and "Vanaheim", as appearing in historical documents, are more or less exclusive to Snorri's account of Norse mythology in the Eddas, and this has led some (most notably Rudolf Simek in his essay "The Vanir: An Obituary") to believe that the Vanir are thus an invention of Snorri, or a misunderstanding in the tales he learned and recorded.

I disagree with this, and both extensive research as well as intensive work with the Vanir over the last ten years - and talking with many, many others who know and love them - has informed my opinion.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Thesseli
    Thesseli says #
    In school, we were taught that the Vanir were the gods of the original inhabitants, and the Aesir were brought in with the Indo-Eu
  • Nornoriel Lokason
    Nornoriel Lokason says #
    Yes! This is what my research and gnosis informs me of as well. You have no idea how ridiculously happy it makes me to know this

Posted by on in Paths Blogs

b2ap3_thumbnail_800px-Cannon_Beach_02.jpgWhile the Vanir are always present in the world around us, I personally tend to feel Them the most strongly in that liminal space when the seasons change: Nerthus when fall becomes winter, Freya when winter becomes spring, Frey when spring becomes summer... and Njord when summer becomes fall.

This is the time of year when depending on where you live, it's still warm enough to be comfortable, but the oppressive heat of summer starts to fade, and the rains come or will be coming soon.  As the land mellows, I feel Njord's gift of serenity, water after fire, which will later wash color into the world.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

While my spiritual path is Hellenic and I primarily honor Greek Deities, I nonetheless am fascinated by the many, many different traditions out there that fall within the large Pagan tent (or set up camp right next to it). As a result, I have a pretty sizable personal library of books on other-than-Hellenic traditions. 

Northern Traditions, and especially the Goddesses honored by those traditions, are a particular favorite subject.* I am always on the lookout for new books on Frigga or Freyja or Epona or Skadhi or Medeine.**

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Rebecca Buchanan
    Rebecca Buchanan says #
    @Kalyca: I love hearing from librarians! There are surprisingly few really good books out there about the Norse Goddesses. Please
  • Kalyca Schultz
    Kalyca Schultz says #
    Thank you for this book list! I look forward to dipping my toes into some of these, especially the ones about Freyja. Just publish

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