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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in witchcraft

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Divination Using Marbles

 

Divination using toys? No, I haven’t lost my marbles. I collect them instead. I do psychic readings with everything in my environment. All of life is sacred. Fun is sacred.

 

I collect marbles. A few weeks ago, I thought it’d be fun to do divination with them. Since I view everything is my environment as an oracle, it was only a matter time before the idea of using marbles for oracle work came to me. ... Hm, honestly, I’ve probably used them that way before this, and not even remembered it; that’s how much a part of my life using everything as oracles is. ...  In any case, this blog is about a psychic reading I did a few weeks ago using marbles.

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Ostara

Here is a little video that I made regarding the upcoming Sabbat of Ostara. Blessings of the Spring Equinox to you all!

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

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Title: Dead Witch on a Bridge (Witches of Sonoma Book One)

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
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[Today, we sit down for a quick interview with Hollow Ryan. The author of the Prideful Magick Collection, Ryan discusses her spiritual path, her books, and her future projects.]
 
BookMusings: How do you define your personal spiritual path? Are you part of a tradition, or more eclectic?
 
Hollow Ryan: I would definitely say my path is super eclectic. I’m a quarter Mohawk, so growing up I had a lot of Native American spirituality injected into my life and it has stayed with me. But I’ve also got Scottish and German ancestry that has led to quite the fascination with Celtic practices and Norse mythology. When you take the time to learn yourself as who you are rather than who you’d like to be, it definitely gives you a sense of what works for you in the moment, and what will definitely help you to become the person you want to be. So that’s the kind of path I’m on. A kind of: Make no apologies for who you are, but make no excuses, either.
 
BookMusings: You recently published the fifth book in the Prideful Magick series. Congratulations! First, what is the significance of that title, and why is each book named for a particular plant?
 
HR: This is a difficult one to answer because this entire series felt more like a spiritual journey than work. I’m not sure if I got to make half of the decisions when writing this. The series title might have been one of the few that I was allowed. The Prideful Magick Collection (PMC for short) was named in part because I didn’t want to call it ’series’ or ’saga’ or anything too normal. I used Magick specifically so people would know by looking at it that this was a story of witches. Since our ‘mini culture’ started adding the ‘k’ to ‘magic’ it was this nice little signal to potential readers that, "Yes, I am one of you.” Prideful, of course, is descriptive of the main character. There is no better word for her.
 
As far as the title names for each book, I didn’t get much of a choice on that one. I barely knew about every plant before; I just knew that was the title. I chose Ivy because I love climbing ivy plants. Yet, as I began plotting each of the next books, the plants came to me almost immediately and they all feature significantly in every book.
 
BookMusings: Alexandria Ryder, the witch at the center of the Prideful Magick series, experiences a lot of growth and change over the five books. Without spoiling too much, is there any one event in the book which you feel is particularly telling in regards to her character, and how she matures?
 
HR: The Prideful Magick Collection is all about Lex’s growth and maturity, especially in the face of the kind of adversity she experiences. To me, there’s a moment in all of them that challenges her more than any other. They are sink or swim moments. They are what force her to choose which step to take next, fully aware of what the outcomes could be. In the fifth book, Avens, it is harder to pin-point that exact moment, and it’s even harder to describe without spoilers. Without giving too much away,  I would say the highest mark of her maturity is when she is no longer afraid to share her responsibilities or magick with others.
 
BookMusings: Where can curious readers find your Prideful Magick series?
 
HR: All of my books are available through Amazon in both paperback and Kindle format. However, any local bookstore should be able to order them, if you wish to support a local business. Also, libraries know how to get their hands on them, too.
 
BookMusings: What other projects are you working on?
 
HR: My next projects will be works of complete fantasy. I have created a world called Vassel (which greatly influenced my own spiritual path) and the books I will be working on in the near future all take place in that world. As of now, I do not have any plans to write stories similar to the PMC, but my plans are more like guidelines instead of rules. So we shall see.
 
Thank you so much for this interview! It was so fun to write, and the questions were very insightful.
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Posted by on in Paths Blogs
The Moon Path Part One

The moon is perhaps the most magical draw to the path of Witchcraft. By its silvery light, the world is changed, is made mysterious and beautiful with darkness around its edges. The moon is utterly enchanting, as we watch it move through its phases, from dark to full and back to dark again. Within the cycle of the moon, we can see the cycle of our lives.

Yet, like all things on this planet, the moon does not operate independently. Its light is a reflection of the sun, and it is held in place by the earth’s gravitational pull. The moon pulls as well, causing the high and low tides, and swelling the world’s seas and oceans with its magnetic draw. So too are we pulled by the energy of the moon, from high to low, from dark to light, dancing in its energy.

Witches have always been associated with the moon. They were said to gather under the light of the full moon for their Sabbaths, or honour moon goddesses with devotional rites. The play of darkness and light with the moon’s energy appeals to many a Witch, who honours both the light and the dark in her or his life. There are many deities associated with the moon, and many cycles from various cultures around the world follow a lunar-based schedule, whether it is for planting or reaping crops, or creating a calendar that honours each of the 13 moons in a year’s cycle.

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs
What is Hedge Witchcraft?

So what is hedge witchcraft? Hedge witchcraft is often seen today as a solitary pursuit, crafting one’s life in a magical way that reflects the talents and abilities of the practitioner. The term hedge witch was coined by the author Rae Beth in her book, Hedge Witch: A Guide to Solitary Witchcraft (1992). She took the term “hedge” from “hedge priest”, one who preached from the hedgerow, and who had no physical place for a congregation. A renegade, a solitary, a priest who didn’t follow the rules. This still appeals to many today, myself included.

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  • Joanna van der Hoeven
    Joanna van der Hoeven says #
    You're most welcome
  • Lynn Hixson
    Lynn Hixson says #
    I really enjoyed this article. Thank you!

Posted by on in Studies Blogs
Witches, Fairies, and Hallowe'en

 When people think of Halloween, or from a more pagan perspective Samhain, the image of witches comes quickly to mind and it may be the single day of the year most strongly associated with witches in Western culture. Yet there is another layer to Halloween that also intersects with witchcraft and witches but isn't as commonly acknowledged in mainstream culture and that is fairies. Halloween and the general period of time around Halloween has long been known in the folklore and folk practices of the various Celtic-language speaking countries to be a time when the Good Folk are more active and more present.

The connection between witches and fairies more generally is complex and multi layered. Scottish witches who were brought to trial mentioned dealing with fairies as often as dealing with demons and were as likely to say they had sworn themselves to the Queen of King of Fairy as to the Christian Devil. This is discussed in Emma Wilby's books 'Cunning Folk and Familiar Spirits' and 'The Visions of Isobel Gowdie' and touched on in Davies 'Popular Magic' which all review various material from the Scottish witchcraft trials in which confessed witches talk about their connections to the fairies. We also see references to both Irish witches and mná feasa [wise women] who learned their skill from the Good Neighbours, as well as specialists called fairy doctors in English who were supposed to have been taught by the fairies (Daimler, 2014). This overlap, briefly summarized here, was one where the witch might both serve Fairy and also be served by it. 

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