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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in women
Pagan savings challenge, week fourteen:  what women want

I heard an interesting story on NPR about women and investing the other day.  The points which jumped out at me were:

  • Women are more risk-averse when it comes to investing, and testosterone plays a part in the gender difference;
  • Fear of an impoverished old age -- women generally have more time as senior citizens -- adds a layer of paralysis which amplifies the hormonal factors;
  • In heteronormative relationships, women are more likely to let the man control the money, even women who are the primary wage earners; and
  • When they invest for themselves, women tend to be better at it than men.

More than a decade into the 21st century, we haven't reached gender parity in how we relate to money.  How much of that difference is cultural and how much is biological isn't clear to me, but differences there certainly are.

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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Women in Druidry

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Joanna van der Hoeven
    Joanna van der Hoeven says #
    I hadn't heard that about Welsh bards - interesting!
  • Lia Hunter
    Lia Hunter says #
    This post makes me want to go explore Welsh mythology more. I hadn't picked up on a passivity in the females of the stories, but I

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs

The magnificent rock paintings of the Kimberly range in northwestern Australia are among the most ancient in the world, going back tens of thousands of years. Radiocarbon dating of a fossilized wasp nest built over one painting places the nest itself at more than 17,000 years ago, so that the painting must be older -- possibly much older -- than that. Aboriginal people in this region call the paintings, or rather the Beings in them, Gwion Gwion, Giro Giro, and other names.

While making my Woman Shaman dvd, I did a lot of research on rock art around the world. These paintings grabbed my attention, not only because of their tremendous beauty, but because they show dance and ceremonial regalia. Aboriginal tradition says they represent ancestral Beings of the Dreamtime. Because human ceremony celebrates these beings, and reenacts their primordial creative acts, we come around full circle to a likely reflection what extremely ancient rites might have looked like. But from North America it was next to impossible to find Aboriginal testimony about these paintings.

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Where Women Gather, Magic Rises: Journeying Into WomanSpirit In 2014

It is a new year, and it’s time for this woman to focus on her quest of connecting with womanspirit, and to focus on this blog as the home base for the exploration of the feminine mysteries and sisterhood.

This year I will be attending the monthly Women’s Sacred Circle at my local Unitarian Universalist congregation, I’ll be making new friends and hopefully forming a coterie of women, and I’ll be starting a spiritual practice that will delve into the feminine mysteries to blend them with my animistic and solitary journey. I might even pray. :) I’m hoping music will have a part, too. In 2014 I am emerging from the wild hedge to dance in the circle of women.

I keep finding myself imagining Artemis emerging from the woods… not lonely since she lives with the animals and plants and moon and earth, but curious about the gathering women, and sensing a sisterhood she belongs to… and taking her place among them, contributing to their presence and magic, and helping to ground it in the earth and lift it toward the stars. Grow…

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  • Rebecca Buchanan
    Rebecca Buchanan says #
    Where did you find that awesome olde timey photograph?
  • Paola Suarez
    Paola Suarez says #
    Clicked on your post thinking you were writing about Where Womyn Gather (www.wherewomyngather.com) the gathering I've been going t

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
The Apache Sunrise Dance

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  • Paola Suarez
    Paola Suarez says #
    I really enjoyed your post Lia. I went to give it 5 stars and the iPad messed up to to 2.5. Wanted you to know so you wouldn't thi
  • Lia Hunter
    Lia Hunter says #
    Thank you for the comment, and I'm glad you enjoyed it, Paola. Blessings to you, too!

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs

b2ap3_thumbnail_Emily-Mills_Queen_Boudica_137.jpgWe look to the past to inform the present and to help define ourselves in relationship to those who have gone before us. For women that type of reflection can be clouded by the assumptions made by researchers operating in patriarchal environments. The role of women throughout history was often over-looked or even misinterpreted. This can still happen today, as we all have internal biases inherited from what our cultures teach us. When we think of women in the distant past, what picture forms in our minds? How does that shape how we feel about ourselves as women today?

In reality, the story of women is far richer, varied, and dynamic than we are taught in our schools and in our popular history. Like the Goddesses we read about, or worship, or simply respect, we have played an active part in all facets of human culture. The amazing legacy of women is one that archaeology and history is constantly uncovering.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Kalyca Schultz
    Kalyca Schultz says #
    I've never made the connection before that both Freyja and Artemis (another Goddess important to me) are charioteers-- perhaps tha
  • Lizann Bassham
    Lizann Bassham says #
    Thank you for your thoughts and questions. I look forward to hearing the whispering from beyond death that your thoughts and ques
  • Tammye McDuff
    Tammye McDuff says #
    I was born to my mother, taught by my grandmothers and birthed by Gaia, she continues to define me.
  • Emily Mills
    Emily Mills says #
    What a blessing to have that background Tammye. Thank you for sharing about your experience.

Posted by on in Studies Blogs

I just had a thought-vampire stories involve a woman falling in love with a competent, but dangerous, man.  Dracula came out in 1897, when the women's movement was strong, soon to result in women's suffrage.   Vampire stories often involve a woman giving up her independence and competency to be with a man.  She's hypnotized, can't look away, and he by turn, wants her lifeblood-that which keeps her alive and functioning.   Is this a perspective on the rights of women?  Is it possible that there is fear that a man will take a woman's right to live away from her? If not by force, than by stealth?  That even so, a woman's nature isn't strong enough to resist?  Are vampire stories in general just reinforcements of patristic ideas?

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