Modern Minoan Paganism: Walking with Ariadne's Tribe

Walk the sacred labyrinth with Ariadne, the Minotaur, the Great Mothers, Dionysus, and the rest of the Minoan pantheon. Modern Minoan Paganism is an independent polytheist spiritual tradition that brings the gods and goddesses of the ancient Minoans alive in the modern world. We're a revivalist tradition, not a reconstructionist one; we rely heavily on shared gnosis and the practical realities of Paganism in the modern world. Ariadne's thread reaches across the millennia to connect us with the divine. Will you follow where it leads?

Find out all about Modern Minoan Paganism on our website: https://ariadnestribe.wordpress.com/. We're a welcoming tradition, open to all who share our love for the Minoan deities and respect for our fellow human beings.

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Laura Perry

Laura Perry

Laura Perry is a priestess and creator who works magic with words, paint, ink, music, textiles, and herbs. She is the founder and Temple Mom of Modern Minoan Paganism. When she's not busy drawing and writing, you can find her in the garden or giving living history demonstrations at local historic sites.

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The Minoan Holiday Season

The Modern Minoan Paganism sacred calendar doesn't look like the eightfold Wheel of the Year that many modern Pagans are familiar with. Instead, we based our calendar specifically on Mediterranean seasonal cycles (the Minoans came from the island of Crete in the Mediterranean) as well as archaeological and ethnological evidence about the Minoans' religious practices.

So instead of a neatly balanced eight-spoke wheel, our calendar has some festivals that are spread out across the months and others that cluster together. One of those clusters - the biggest one - is my focus today.

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The Minoan Herb Garden and Spice Cabinet

Last time, we looked at what kinds of vegetables the Minoans grew in their gardens. But they needed to season those veggies so they were especially tasty to eat, right? So what kinds of herbs and other seasonings did they use?

The first and most obvious one is salt. Like other island-dwelling people, the Minoans used sea salt. It's easy to make - just collect up some sea water and evaporate the liquid, using heat from the Sun or from fire. The Minoans were surely doing this all the way back in the Neolithic, though most of the evidence for it comes from later on.

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The Minoan Vegetable Garden

Some aspects of Minoan civilization feel very modern: big cities with paved roads, aqueducts, and enclosed sewer systems. But there were no supermarkets back in the Bronze Age, no international shipping of out-of-season produce.

I've written before about Minoan cooking methods and typical foods. I've even shared a grocery list of sorts, a compilation of all the foods we have evidence for - foods the Minoans cooked and ate.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    No doubt the Minoans also gathered a wide variety of wild greens, as the yiayias of Greece still do.
  • Laura Perry
    Laura Perry says #
    Yes, horta was apparently popular in Minoan times, as far as we can tell. I commented a bit about that in my post about the Minoan
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    Are you sure Eggplants are from the Americas? I thought they were from Southeast Asia.
  • Laura Perry
    Laura Perry says #
    You may be right. The Wikipedia entry for eggplant states "There is no consensus about the place of origin of eggplant" but the pl

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How old is that blog post?

I began this blog in 2014. A lot of things have happened since then.

When I wrote the first blog post, Modern Minoan Paganism didn't exist yet. I and a handful of others were still groping around in the dark, doing our best to put the pieces together to figure out what the picture of ancient Minoan religion looked like. We hadn't even begun determining how to turn that into a modern spiritual practice.

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Individuation Is Problematic

Individuation is problematic. That's the unofficial Modern Minoan Paganism motto.

It's sort of a joke, a witty response to difficult questions about divinity. But it's also very serious.

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The Minoan Genius: Religion and Cultural Exchange

The Minoans were a seafaring, trading people who traveled all over the eastern Mediterranean and points beyond. During those travels, they encountered other cultures. They brought back objects from faraway places: cylinder seals from Mesopotamia, carved stone jars and jewelry from Egypt. They probably brought back spouses/partners from the places they traveled to.

They also brought deities back with them.

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Confluence: Flowing Together

For some time now, Ariadne's Tribe has been developing our own counterpart to the hieros gamos as it's known from ancient Mesopotamian, Greek, and Buddhist traditions and that's expressed in modern Paganism via acts such as the Wiccan Great Rite.

We wanted a concept and a practice that we could use in our rituals that would encompass the idea of communion with deity as well as connection with each other and with the non-human beings whose spirits also fill our world. And we wanted it to be inclusive, avoiding any kind of gender binary.

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