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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in birds

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Beltane

Page 35 [Beltane] “is a celebration on the union of soil, water, sun and seed.  It is about fertilizing the fields.” Sisters of the Dark Moon by Gail Wood

Growing up on a farm, May was about picking rocks, working long long hours, and falling into bed exhausted.  You would think no longer being on a farm, this time would not be missed but I do miss it.  We would walk the land, barefoot, picking up rocks and being who we are picking out the best to bring home rather than just dumping them in the rock piles.  It was all about the land and preparing for the next crop.  There was a sense of urgency and hope.  We needed the crops to feed our animals.  Our animals kept us in milk, beef, and pork.  There was also our own garden which had be put in, tended, and nurtured as the summer came on.  

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Pagan News Beagle: Earthy Thursday, February 18

A South Korean temporarily bans motor vehicles, leading to a surprising result. An asteroid passes close to Earth, missing it but getting close enough for some spectacular images. And the Modi government in India comes into conflict with the scientific community. It's Earthy Thursday, our weekly segment on science and Earth-related news! All this and more for the Pagan News Beagle!

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FAIRY-WREN: Discover the Deeper Truth

Often seen in people’s gardens, Fairy-wren (Family: Malurus) is usually looking for a tasty Insect. Shy in nature, Fairy-wren is however tolerant of people. Popular in Australia, people regularly see Him in parks hopping about.

Despite his brilliant blue colors, Fairy-wren is difficult to see in the undergrowth. Since Male Fairy-wren is more cautious than the Female Fairy-wren (who has drabber feathers), He leaves promptly when an intruder approaches. If Fairy-wren spies a flying Insect, He hops straight up to snatch it, and then dives back to safety in the nearby bushes.

Fairy-wren’s family arrangements were confusing to many scientists. They thought He was socially monogamous but sexually promiscuous. However what they mistook for Female Fairy-wrens were the non-breeding Males. In Fairy-wren’s small group, there is one breeding pair – the dominant Female and her Partner. Because Fairy-wrens live long lives, They often form lasting family bonds. In their territories, Female Fairy-wrens will nest several times during a season. The non-breeding Males will help to raise each brood, and defend their area. When these Fairy-wrens are about four years old, They will leave their home nest.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
EURASIAN WREN: Sacred Mysteries

The “Wren” of Europe, Eurasian Wren (Troglodytes troglodytes) is the only Wren that lives in the Old World. Known as Bran’s Sparrow to the Celts, Wren foretold the future with his songs. The Celts called their sacred Wren “Drui”, (meaning “The Druid among Birds”). Under the protection of Taranis, the Celtic God of Thunder, Wren often nested in his oaks. Killing a Wren brought the wrath of the Gods upon unwary people.

To various peoples from Japan to Germany, Eurasian Wren is the King of the Winds. Plutarch tells the story of how the Wren became the King of the Birds. The Birds decided whoever could fly the highest to the sun would rule over Them. The Eurasian Wren secreted Himself under Golden Eagle’s down feathers. When Golden Eagle tired, Eurasian Wren flew out and ascended higher, getting singed by the sun’s rays. Returning, the other Birds proclaimed Eurasian Wren their King. Cunning and cleverness had outwitted strength.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
WREN FAMILY: The Mysteries of Happiness

Wrens, a family of little brown Birds, are well-known for their high energy and trilling songs. Friendly and active, House Wren is often called “Jenny Wren” in children’s storybooks. Meanwhile Carolina Wren, one of the largest Wrens, flits from perch to perch looking for tasty bugs, delighting gardeners.

Voracious in their nesting endevours, Wrens build nests in boots, mailboxes, and even car radiators. Quick and agile Cactus Wren builds his nest amongst the sharp spines of a cactus. To impress the Female Wrens, Marsh Wren frantically builds as many dummy nests that He can in the wetlands. The scientific name for Wrens is “Troglodytidae,” which means “cave dwellers.” This comes from the elaborate enclosed nests that many Wrens build. Besides housing eggs, these roofed nests also act as their communal roosts.

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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
The time of birds

It’s the first day of December, and most of the leaves are now down from the trees where I live. There’s one little ash tree that is, somehow, still mostly green but the yellows are creeping in there, too. It’s been a matter of weeks since enough leaves fell from the horsechestnut to reveal the bird feeder I put there last year.

During the summer, bird watching is a difficult activity because there’s so much cover. Seeing a whole bird isn’t easy unless you can put up a bird table and lure them out into the open. In years when I’ve been able to do that, it’s still not been easy to see birds in summer because most of them prefer to be in the trees or out in the fields. I’ve noticed that birds tend to return to urban gardens in the winter, they’ve got wise to bird feeders.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
A Drunkenness of Birds

Yesterday there were no robins. Today, right on cue—the first day of spring—they're everywhere.

The birds are back, and busily pairing off. Last week I heard the first mourning dove. Today I saw two of them, back in the mulberry tree where they always nest—if one can grace with the name “nest” a few twigs tossed together into the fork of a branch. Actually, there were three doves in the tree, but I'm afraid the third is going to have to look elsewhere. Reputation aside—and they really do lay up to 6 clutches a year—doves are monogamous.

The robins are pairing off too. So are the sparrows and the newly-returned starlings. The branches of the City of Trees are filled with flirtations and love-chases. Mating: the real March Madness.

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