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PaganSquare is a community blog space where Pagans can discuss topics relevant to the life and spiritual practice of all Pagans.

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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Coming of Age, in Fur and Feather

This is the time of year when many of the young things born in the UK’s spring will become independent. Inevitably it means this is also a time when a lot of them will die, through accident and inexperience.

The transition from dependant to independent varies from species to species, and part of why it varies is the complexity involved in being an adult. You can spot newly fledged birds, because they’re often waiting around making a racket, with parents coming back to feed them regularly even though they’re now out of the nest. They look like teenagers.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Nimue Brown
    Nimue Brown says #
    What a brilliant way of doing things! And a good way of reinforcing the responsibilities we have to our communities in taking part
  • Ann Edwards
    Ann Edwards says #
    When I was young we had a number of family celebrations or events which recognised various stages of coming of age. The first one

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

Happy Canada Day!  I thought that it might be fun to celebrate Canada Day by sharing the meaning and magick behind a few of Canada's national symbols.

Maple Trees by David Wagner. Public domain image courtesy Publicdomainpictures.net
Maple Trees by David Wagner. Public domain image courtesy Publicdomainpictures.net

Maple

One of the most striking of Canada's national symbols is the maple leaf that adorns our flag.  Something that people come from all over the world to see is the beauty of our maple forests in Central Canada showing In the fall.  Though at this time of year, the leaves of the Canadian maple are still green.  This is one and the same with the famous maple tree that produces the sap that becomes maple syrup.

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WHAT DOES INDEPENDENCE MEAN TO YOU?

The term "independence" conjures up different images for different individuals. For patriotic types, if you tack "day" on to the end of the word, their eyes might glaze over with star-spangled flags – the drumbeats of parades immediately filling their ears. That's all well and good. However, for some of us introverts, going solo is sheer heaven. For the most important aspect of independence, it would seem to me, would be the act of not being dependent on another person. In fact, the direct opposite of it. Not to say that we don't all need a little help occasionally. As much as one would like to strive for total freedom, we are dependent on other human beings for our survival. Plus, some of them aren't bad company.

That said, there is a certain liberty in doing things for yourself and going your own way from time to time. If you can this Fourth of July weekend – why not slip away from the crowd – even for but a little while? Strike out on your own and define what independence means to you. Here are some creative ideas to try out, and possibly spur a few of your own:

A HIKE (EARTH)
Travel to a path that you've always wanted to get your feet dirty on and commence. Breathe in the greenery and decompress. This could include a solo camp, as well. If you happen to be female, just be sure to pitch your tent far away from the sleazies who see your being alone as an open invitation to visit your site and hit on you.

A LONG DRIVE (AIR)
If you have a reliable vehicle and your life has been making you a bit batty as of late, just get in and go. Roll down the windows, blast the tunes that speak to you, and let your hair get messy in the wind. Drive until you can't anymore, with no destination in mind. Then check yourself into a nice hotel. Granted, this is a splurge, but stick with me here. Stock up on munchies and drinkables. Pretend you're a character in a movie making your great escape from something or someone. Treat yourself to bad cable movies and/or naughty ones. Pop a bottle of champagne and bounce on the bed. You are free! (Just don't trash the room, OK)? Ask for a late checkout time.

EXPLORING A NEW LOCALE (FIRE)
This could be a small town, or a large one. Although the independence theme would more likely lend itself to the former. Let yourself wander. Peruse some shops and let your mind wander, too. Buy an ice cream with a flavor you've always wanted to try. The key to utilizing your inner fire is to be bold in your choices, and wait to see where your inspiration takes you.

A BOATING EXPEDITION (WATER)
If you consider yourself a strong swimmer and have experience under your belt, find a place to rent a small craft and get out on the H20. Sailing offers a mentally and physically challenging combination, which can be infinitely satisfying. If you're looking for something more mellow, launch in a canoe, kayak, or rowboat. Row yourself out to the middle and drift awhile. See how good that feels? Sigh.

VISIT A BUDDHIST TEMPLE OR OLD UNFENCED GRAVEYARD (SPIRIT)
The key here is to find one that is secluded and that you have never been to before. Plant yourself and meditate. My favorite spot in an old cemetery is under a friendly tree. Discover where your mind takes you. Happy Independence Day.


Photo by AJ Page

 

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Posted by on in Studies Blogs
Recent History: Doreen Valiente

I usually stick to much older history, but having had the chance to catch the Doreen Valiente exhibit at Preston Manor in Brighton, I figured I should share a few pictures as I know it's a bit tricky for many folks to get there. The exhibit itself is small but there's a great delight in seeing how intimately history is made by a most unassuming woman. I picked up Philip Heseltine's biography too and am much enjoying it. Here are some of the artifacts collected:

b2ap3_thumbnail_2016-06-22-11.58.44.jpg

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Posted by on in Studies Blogs
Wisteria's Summer Solstice

For many years I would travel to Wisteria for Pagan Spirit Gathering.  From 2001 until 2008 I spent my Summer Solstice at Wisteria at PSG and loved it.  The community was phenomenal and the energy amazing; however, in 2009 PSG moved to a different location.  Ironically, just as I was going through a divorce it would seem the PSG also went through a divorce with Wisteria and the festival moved to a different venue.  I loved the sense of community that I felt at PSG, but I was also very much in love with the land at Wisteria.  It had a magical and mystical quality for me.

When my father died in 2004 I made a pilgrimage the following year to Wisteria's Faerie Shrine, a location at Wisteria that wasn't part of the PSG programming, and made an offering of my father's US Navy dog tag.  In 2008 I attended Between the Worlds Festival at Wisteria and while there I attended a ritual at the Faerie Shrine honoring our ancestors and sacred dead.  When I enter the Faerie Shrine I can feel my father's presence and the love he has for me as one of my sacred ancestors.  The Faerie Shrine at Wisteria always had an ethereal quality for me that added to the magical and mystical quality of the overall site.  My connection to the land is real and has meaning for me.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Greenways

i.

They call them the greenways.

They're prehistoric trackways that thread their way across the landscape. The famous Ridgeway, which follows the line of ridges across the heart of southern England, is said to be more than 5000 years old. It is part of the old Icknield Way, named for the Keltic Iceni tribe of more than 2000 years ago. (Boudicca was queen of the Iceni.)

In fact, such greenways exist all over the world. I live just a few feet from one myself.

These days Lake Street isn't very green. It looks pretty much like any four-lane main drag in America, lined with mom-pop eateries (where these days you can get tripe soup, corn fungus tacos, and whole roast guinea pig), convenience stores, and halal groceries.

But beneath the pavement runs the old Indian trail that led from the Dakota summer village on Bde Maka Ska ("White Earth Lake," latterly known as Lake Calhoun) down to the Mississippi. The old tracks often lead to water.

The greenways were the true ley-lines of old. Beneath the asphalt, they still pulse with ancient power.

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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
All Acts of Love and Pleasure Radio

Did you know I co-host a radio show

Every first and third Wednesday, and occasional fifth Wednesdays, my cohost Michael Greywolf and I host All Acts of Love and Pleasure on Pagans Tonight Radio Network. We talk about it all on the show -- love, sex, sexuality, gender, relationships, and whatever else we come up with, all from a Pagan perspective! We go live at 7pm CDT.

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