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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Tarot, Tea, and Thee

I’ve often thought the world might get along better if we all stopped for afternoon tea. Sadly, Americans just aren’t into that, since a traditional tea would be served around 3 or 4 p.m. That tends to be a rather hectic time for many, as kids are getting home from school, or the workday is coming to a close and deadlines have to be met. Instead of relaxing with a warm cuppa, we often see how far we can push ourselves before dinner.

Maybe that is why I’ve always romanticized the idea of an English tea, even before Downton Abbey was born. It’s not the dainty cups or the finger sandwiches or the scones—it’s the pause and the connection with others, assuming they put down their smart phones.  

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Dragon Dancer
    Dragon Dancer says #
    I'm disabled so getting out and about, or sometimes even wanting others around, can be iffy at best and difficult sometimes. That
  • Dragon Dancer
    Dragon Dancer says #
    OMG what an awesome idea! Thank you for doing this for those around you, and for sharing with the rest of us.
  • Jen
    Jen says #
    It's truly my pleasure. If you ever have any questions about hosting a Tarot & Tea of your own, feel free to ask. I've found that
Those Old Witch Songs Are All a Little Bit Sad

There's a round that we sing in the Spring about new life rising up again out of the darkness:

Now the green blade riseth from the buried grain:

wheat that in the deep Earth many days hath lain.

Love lives again, that with the dead hath been:

love is come again, like wheat that springeth green.

The tune is delicate, poignant: a song of joy in a minor key.

This is no ignorant joy, a happiness too inexperienced (or too stupid) to know anything different. This is the joy of the wise: the happiness of those who know life and all the sorrows that it must inevitably bring, and yet choose joy.

Witches are well-acquainted with trouble. As a people, we've seen many, many sorrows down the long years, nor (alas) are they over yet. As we must, we remember them all.

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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs



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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
The Alchemy of Dyeing Eggs

Tomorrow's one of my favorite days of the year.

Egg-Dye Sunday.

This year will be our 38th Annual. (Usually it would be the Sunday before the Evenday, but next weekend we've got Paganicon.)

The year was 1980. I'd just blown into town, and Ostara was coming up. I'd been reading about dyeing eggs with natural dyestocks in folklorist Venetia Newall's indispensible An Egg at Easter and wanted to give it a try.

So a small group of us—myself, Knight, Tanith, Volkhvy, and Grog—got together in Tanith's kitchen to give it a try.

We've been doing it every year since. It's the oldest ongoing tradition in the local community that I had a hand in helping to found.

This being the Midwest, of course, we start off with a potluck: in this case, brunch. Then we stoke up the dye-pots—natural dyes are mostly heat-applied—and the annual alchemy begins.

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  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    ...asparagus, strawberries, deviled eggs, cheesecake....
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    Ham, sweet gherkins, and deviled eggs are the foods I associate with Spring/Easter.

In my recent Tapestry interview, I spent a few moments addressing the question of the relationship between magic and prayer. Since then, I've had several interesting conversations pursuing this particular question, and it reminded me of a short posting which I published years ago, in conversation with Adelina St. Clair, author of The Path of a Christian Witch. I'm re-posting that short essay here, and I'd love to hear from others about your thoughts on this topic.

One of the reasons I’m interested in this question of the relationship between magic and prayer, is that as a pastor and theologian, I often hear people talking about intercessory prayer saying something like 'well, it isn’t magic you know'. To me, it seems like that sort of statement misses the point of both magic and prayer. But it reveals that for many people (Christian and Pagan alike), intercessory prayer is about asking God to do something, and magic is making something happen praeternaturally, but without the direct assistance of God/dess.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Everyone Wants to be a Radical

When Congress passed the Freedom of Information Act in the late 60s, writer and Druid Isaac Bonewits (1949-2010) couldn't wait to see his FBI file. What would it say?

Subversive religious thinker?

Dangerous radical?

Finally the file arrived. Eagerly, Isaac tore it open.

Harmless religious fanatic, said the file.


These days, it sometimes seems like everyone wants to be a radical.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Chambered Nautilus: Sacred Geometry

Usually thought of as a living fossil, the Chambered Nautilus (Nautilus pompilius) has been on the earth much longer than any fish. A relative of the squid and octopus, the Chambered Nautilus uses jet propulsion to zip around the ocean at high speeds (although backwards). Unlike the other cephalopods, She lives in a shell, and has up to ninety tentacles. Moreover, the Chambered Nautilus can live to be twenty years old, an unusually long life-span for a cephalopod. (Most only have life spans of three to five years.) 

Living in the depths of the sea, the Chambered Nautilus migrates nightly up the water’s surface. At night, She hunts along the coral reefs. Exploring with her beak, the Chambered Nautilus will find a tasty crab, fish, or shrimp to feast on. 

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  • Virginia Carper
    Virginia Carper says #
    This comment seems to be an advertisement for essay writing company. The link does not go a writing about the nautilus.
  • Ember Moon
    Ember Moon says #
    The nautilus is a cephalopod, which means it is related to animals like the octopus and the squid. Modern cephalopods evolved from

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