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SageWoman Blogs

At SageWoman magazine, we believe that you are the Goddess, and we're devoted to celebrating your journey. We invite you to subscribe today and join our circle...

Here in the SageWoman section of PaganSquare, our bloggers represent the multi-faceted expressions of the Goddess, feminist, and women's spirituality movements.

Mental Illness, Judgment, and Habit: 3 Most Important Lessons I've Learned as a Mother

I’m waiting here, on the precipice of another rebirth, contemplating what I’ve learned during this long, quiet gestation.  Any day now, I’ll be reborn as a mother of two, and this baby is already teaching me, and reinforcing lessons I learned from my first, like how to relax when confronted with things beyond my control. 

Today I find myself reflecting on the most important lessons I’ve learned since becoming a mother of one six years ago.  In no particular order, here are my top three.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Niki
    Niki says #
    Catching up on blog posts from my favorite bloggers and people today...I didn't even finish reading before I went and bought a cop
  • Molly
    Molly says #
    Oh, and you might find some of my past posts about postpartum helpful: http://talkbirth.me/category/postpartum/
  • Molly
    Molly says #
    Important observations. Congratulations on the upcoming new baby and best wishes for a nurturing, healing, beautiful postpartum ba
  • Ashley Rae
    Ashley Rae says #
    Thank you, Molly. y baby was stillborn. I am writing about his birth and the aftermath today.

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    Bone wind has returned b2ap3_thumbnail_February-2015-117.JPG
    mother of winter’s chill
    sweeping through bare branches
    and rattling dusty leaves.

    The remnants of summer
    have completely faded
    and the doorway to the new year
    has cracked open.

    With the skeletal swirl of frost and freeze
    I see the hint
    of new things
    waiting to burst from behind the door.

    Hibernating now perhaps
    hunkered down to wait it out
    resting, biding time, percolating
    nestled in darkness
    but, oh so ready, to grow.

    It is only on the surfaceb2ap3_thumbnail_February-2015-122.JPG
    that the world prepares to take a long nap
    underneath the crust
    change boils
    life bubbles
    new ideas gestate
    and time crowns anew
    with the promise and potential of birth
    held in cupped hands.

    The flame of fresh ideas flickers
    and catches
    until the blaze of possibility
    envelopes the cold.

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Breaking The Mother Goose Code

Imagine... What if Mother Goose was the ancient European Mother Goddess in disguise, hidden from the patriarchal, monotheistic church that took over Europe, appearing in print just as the Inquisition and Witch-hunts drove anything non-Christian underground? What if the Mother Goose “nursery rhymes” taught to children over the last few centuries were a way to pass on an encoded pre-Christian worldview? Are fairy tales the carriers of the Pagan values of ancestors who had to disguise them as “peasant imbecilities” to keep them in cultural memory in a stratified society, of which the hierarchical authorities wanted to eradicate their egalitarian, animistic, and earthy worldview?

These questions are explored in Jeri Studebaker’s new book, “Breaking the Mother Goose Code: How a Fairy-Tale Character Fooled the World for 300 Years” published by Moon Books. I was excited to read the advance copy I asked for, since folklore and fairy tales have always fascinated me, and I really love reading about history - especially Pagan history. I know I’m not alone in these interests, so I thought I’d share my thoughts on the book after reading it.

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  • Constance Tippett Chandler
    Constance Tippett Chandler says #
    Dear Lia, Just got Studebaker's book. Great read! Plus she wrote another book that i just love "Switching to Goddess" I recomme
  • Constance Tippett Chandler
    Constance Tippett Chandler says #
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oVbB1tkKkFg Dear Lia, Go to this video that I made about The Real Mother Goose if you want to see
  • Lia Hunter
    Lia Hunter says #
    Thank you for sharing your video, Constance. The intriguing artifacts like the goose boat and the chariot pulled by geese were coo

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To the Goddess, With Love!

Dearest Love.... 

I want you to know how much you mean to me. How much my life has changed and become fuller simply in the knowing of you. There are so many ways in which you have shown me your love and understanding and for these I am eternally grateful. And, as I sit here writing this to you, my beloved, memory of you floods through my being.

...
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b2ap3_thumbnail_199px-First_Book_of_Kings_Chapter_8-3_Bible_Illustrations_by_Sweet_Media.jpgLike many holidays, Valentine's Day holds a secret.

In earlier times, this day was a celebration of women's pro-creative power — our body-centered power to renew life, and the pleasure of doing so!

This poem, unearthing Celtic, Roman, and heretical Christian strands weaving through Valentine's Day, begins...

This Valentine came in the mail today —
the fe-male, that is:
Greetings from history in women's terms.

Valentine's Day is a fraud, of course, you know that,
Hall-marked and carded as it is for commerce.
But more than that:

The boy himself's a fraud.
St. Valentine's a fiction, the convenient invention
of some grim Christian churchmen.

...and comes to you complete with historical notes, such as

and where the fever starts:
Words such as fever, febrile, and February have their origin in Februata as an epithet of the Great Goddess.

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Valentine’s and the Self-Married Woman

(Blog image by Tom LaBaff)

This is my first Valentine’s as a self-married woman.

...
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  • Jeanine Byers
    Jeanine Byers says #
    I am self-married, too (and I did it in May, too, on Beltane, a couple of years ago). Hope you have a wonderful Valentine's Day!
  • Ashley Rae
    Ashley Rae says #
    I did have a wonderful Valentine's, thanks Jeanine! How was yours?
  • Jeanine Byers
    Jeanine Byers says #
    It was great, thanks!

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Goddess Roots of Mardi Gras in New Orleans

With Mardi Gras just around the corner I thought I'd share an excerpt from my first published book, Sacred Places of Goddess: 108 Destinations.  You see, I lived the first thirty years of my life in New Orleans without a clue about the Pagan and Goddess roots of Mardi Gras.  When you live in that Christian bubble, you tend not look beyond it, but then when you do, a tsunami of awakening might be the result, as it was for me.....

Vieux Carre
The essence of Goddess, as a celebration of life, holds sway in New Orleans at the very core of the people, even if they're unaware of it.  Life there moves at a slower pace and New Orleanians see no reason to catch up. It is a city proud of its diverse cultural and ethnic heritage, where people look for just about any excuse to indulge in the pleasures of food, drink, and partying. There is a sense of life being a bit more in-sync with the natural rhythms and life’s simple pleasures. Despite the influence of the Catholic Church, the lifestyle in New Orleans is hardly dogmatic or puritanical. In the Big Easy, as the city is often called, the spirit of the Feminine is also reflected in the Old World charm of the architecture in the Vieux Carre, in celebrations such as Mardi Gras with its pagan roots dating back to the rituals of the Lupercalia, Cybele and Attis, and in the worship of the Virgin Mary, Our Lady of Guadalupe, and various goddesses in the Yoruban pantheon.

...
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